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Fri Jan 18, 2013 at 09:09 AM PST

Update: Salt Lake Meet Up

by War on Error

Reposted from War on Error by War on Error

SLC

Sigh!  I can't seem to shake this goombah/whatever so, sadly, I won't be able to attend tomorrow.  I am simply exhausted, even though the symptoms have cleared up, so no big worry.

However, our dear middleagedhousewife will be there wearing the orange.  Thank you MAHW!

Enjoy the Oasis and each other's great company.  Also, maybe gather some ideas for a late February get together.

Kos on, SLC!

I'll be there in spirit.

The Oasis is delightful.

And there is ample, free parking.

Oasis Free Parking

The atmosphere and food are both wonderful.  The Oasis Cafe building is also the home of the Golden Braid Bookstore, a browsing delight.  

Books, great food, and you.  Sounds like a fabulous way to cheer in the New Year.

The Oasis is a tad pricey for dinner, for me anyway.  However, they serve lunch until 5:00 PM.  The menu is vegetarian friendly and diverse.  

The lunch menu can be viewed here

The Oasis also offers a huge variety of beverages which are reasonably priced, view here.

For those with both the penchant and the budget, there is also a full bar service, view here.  Actually, the bar prices are quite reasonable.

Lastly, although not listed separately, there are wonderful desserts for those who would enjoy good company and perhaps some panna cotta:

"I have a happy place.  Its name is panna cotta at Oasis Cafe.  This was the best dessert I've had since I moved to Salt Lake City.  My mum and I ordered it and it totally blew our socks off.  The softly set and creamy Italian pudding is silky smooth and not overly sweet, which for me is the perfect dessert.  The Oasis version is served infused with lavender accompanied by strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, honeyed ricotta cheese and pistachio crumbles.  I am now planning to go back to my happy place as soon as possible.

- Daisy Blake, IN This Week

Well, back to some restful reading and chicken broth with lots of fresh garlic and veggies.
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Reposted from War on Error by War on Error Editor's Note: Truth is timeless. -- War on Error

The Republicans, since 1980, always run up our National Deficit.  It's a fact.

Nat'l Deficit Graph

Will the Democrats EVER start shouting this from the rooftops?

Will we EVER see this chart on the news?

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Reposted from DIVA by War on Error Editor's Note: Wow. We made top billing today. I sent Navajo a thank you note on our behalf. Also sent you an email. -- War on Error
New Day Grand Canyon Sunrise Banner
Every day is a new day and with that, a new opportunity.
EVERYONE is welcome and please join us each morning at 7:30 AM PACIFIC
to tell us what you're working on, share your show & tell, vent, whatever you want...  
...this is an open thread. Nothing is off topic.

What are your five favorite songs right now?

I have music playing during all my waking hours. There are 1,578 songs or 4.5 days of music on my iPod. I also listen to Pandora where I've created my own listening station which is super wonderful and have discovered tons of new music there. XM radio plays in my car while driving. I've been known to pull over and write down a new song or use the voice recorder on my phone to create a reminder to buy a tune.

STERNLY WORDED EMAIL: You should embed only ONE video of your top song but just list links for the remaining four. Don't make our page too unmanageable for those with system issues.
This is not my top list of all time. This is currently what is playing in my head when I wake up so I queue them up several times a day.

My number one for at least a few more hours:

Bloodstream  -  Stateless

I think I might've inhaled you
I could feel you behind my eyes
You gotten into my bloodstream
I could feel you floating in me

It's from a vampire kissing scene, so that appeals to me. [shrugs...]

Now, for the other four.

Unemployed In Summertime  -  Emiliana Torrini (Video is terrific)

(If you're the least bit melancholy, don't listen to the next two.)
I Really Should've Gone Out Last Night  -  Dirty Three

Long Way To Go With No Punch  -  Dirty Three

So This Is Goodbye (Pink Ganter Remix)  -  William Fitzsimmons

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ATTENTION: Salt Lake City Kossacks!
ACTION event this coming Thursday!


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Heal Utah Rally January 10, 2013 1230PM Salt Palace
Thursday, January 10th

Salt Lake City Kossacks' Attend UTAH CITIZENS DEMANDING CLEAN AIR Rally

TIME: 12:30 PM
LOCATION: Outside the Salt Palace Convention Center
Corner of 200 South and West Temple • Salt Lake City

ORGANIZER: Send War on Error a kosmail for details on connecting there.

Latest diary: SLC Action Item - CLEAN AIR RALLY Jan. 10, 2013 @ 12:30 PM

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Latest Updates on Kossack Regional Meet-Up News Below the Fold
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Reposted from richholtzin by jlms qkw

Prologue with a Sobering Realism: The popularity of Glen Canyon with its new emblem, National Recreation Area (established October, 1972)  promotes an image of a multi-use facility that opened its aquatic doors to the masses some fifty years ago. Whether it’s an improvement or a desecration of the environment depends on one’s perspective, and to some degree, one’s personal desires. Nevertheless, the revamping of Glen Canyon’s original habitat is what it is. This modern day semblance is here to stay for quite some time. So are arguments against the canyon’s retrofit.

There is also something else rather singular about this topic: one is either for the changeover or against it. However, the lopsided dichotomy (meaning, more people are in favor of the lake adaptation) is really not about advocates vs. malcontents. Rather, it’s more the case what is known about the real facts of the matter, where awareness backed by science and scientific studies, tends to label the malcontent types as suspicious, farfetched and overly dramatic compared to point of view held by advocates. If this simplistic way of looking at things is bothersome for some, behold the essence of almost any two-sided issue promoting extreme points of view, say, politics. Given the longstanding arguments about the lake and the dam that’s exactly the basis that feeds this contentious issue––politics centered on functionary mandates that were vogue before the 1970s but are now mostly outmoded.

What follows in this opening diary denotes a more or less ample background. It is especially written for those who know little or nothing about what happened ever since the Glen Canyon Dam became a reality in the 1960s. The confrontations and principles fought between a so-called archdruid and a tough-minded commissioner. Their fabled wrangling has been prime subject matter for Southwest studies on and off the campus and has since casts its story to the four winds. Whenever the topic of Lake Powell arises, it’s like someone just lit a match and a powder keg of explosive and opposing views detonates, then builds to a large mushroom, only the fallout is not radioactive, though nonetheless incendiary. The rest of this saga follows after the the fancy break indicator. . .

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Tue Jan 01, 2013 at 01:10 PM PST

Imagine a future

by Cassiodorus

Reposted from The Rebel Alliance by War on Error

in which the human race survives global warming.  What does it look like?

In a likely dystopian future, everyone will die off except a few financial elites, and their servants in the political classes (and the servants of those servants), huddled in McMansions along the newly-desertified Arctic Ocean coasts, what's left of the race (after the enormous die-offs) pretty much waiting for Earth to become Venus.

The folks imposing Race to the Top upon our public schools are no doubt helping to bring this future into being, with their obsessions with testing, teacher disempowerment, and charter schools.  Researchers know for sure that charter schools don't really improve the test scores in the aggregate -- the point of RttT is to bust the unions and subsidize the corporations some more.  After all, if our political masters are looking to inflate housing bubbles for the indefinite future, those newly-sizzling Arctic Ocean beachfront McMansions are going to be mighty expensive, and so some privileged someone, some corporate school administrator or Teach for America beneficiary, is going to have to be able to afford them.  It certainly won't be the lower-income students of inner-city charter schools.  No, they get to die when the droughts and plagues kill off American agriculture -- the food riots will be the final coup de grace.  Remember, folks -- education is what we do to our children, and our children are the future.

So that future hardly makes for a cheery science fiction movie -- J. J. Abrams won't pony up any start-up capital to film that one, since it's neither about hope nor love, though maybe the die-off of billions would make a good Peter Jackson movie.  (And remember that as you see the Hobbit movies -- Jackson was into horror flicks before he got the rights to do Tolkien.)  But I'm sure we can make that future possible.  David Roberts thinks so too, or at least that's what he suggests in this video:

Climate change isn't complicated, as Roberts points out: if the human race continues in habit-formed fashion, it's screwed.  And with EPA administrators leaving because there's no traction on climate change, well, you know the rest.  I'm sure someone from Monsanto will fill the position admirably.  Nothing to see here -- move along.

Some of you may have heard of David Shearman and Joseph Wayne Smith's (2007) book The Climate Change Challenge and the Failure of Democracy.  I'm going to attempt a short review of this book, which speculates upon a future which I regard as quite probable, and then move on to my main point, which is that we as a society ought to take an interest in all this futurism because without it we really won't be looking to know what's coming.

The major flaw of Shearman and Smith's book, of course, is that it proposes a post-capitalist dictatorship -- and this aspect of Shearman and Smith's book will please neither the fans of the capitalist system, who imagine that capitalism will last forever, nor the fans of democracy, who think (as the Archdruid does in the link above) that Shearman and Smith are merely repeating the failures of climate change activists.  After all, nobody really wants dictatorship as a solution.  People especially won't like proposals of a future dictatorship if they are being proposed by a climate scientist (Shearman) who worked on the IPCC reports.  No doubt all of these things caused "The Climate Change Challenge and the Failure of Democracy" to fade into book oblivion in the four years since it was published.

Now, if you actually read the book itself (omigod we're not going to dismiss it outright!), you can get a bit more of an idea of the authors' reasoning.  Climate change is urgent -- in fact, it's far more urgent than the leaders of our liberal democracies are willing to admit.  Domination is the norm throughout history, Shearman and Smith argue, and all of our efforts at democracy here in the US have (as they point out) in fact merely produced corporate plutocracy.  Corporate plutocracy is, as the authors also point out, the problem, the reason why climate change is so urgent and why our democracies are in denial about this urgency.  It's also the reason why carbon emissions continue to accelerate.  So anyone who really wants to confront Shearman and Smith's argument will also have to confront the failure of democracy to do anything real about abrupt climate change.  Seriously folks.  If the best we can do is a joke like the Kyoto Protocol?  They imagine that there will be some sort of "office of the biosphere" that will handle all this stuff at some point.  It's a Plato solution, as the Archdruid points out -- philosopher-kings on top.

People who want to confront Shearman and Smith's argument will also have to confront their critique of classical liberalism.  Classical liberalism is of course the philosophy of John Locke and Adam Smith -- the philosophy of small business in the emerging capitalism of 18th-century England and of the settler populations of the New World.  For the classical liberals, everything hinges on the decisions of individuals operating within a context of capitalist economy, and for Shearman and Smith, these decisions generally support what's good for business, which is then bad for the environment.  Shearman and Smith argue that liberal democracy is responsible for what Garrett Hardin called the "tragedy of the commons."

Okay, if you haven't read the book, or even if you have, the Shearman and Smith vision looks like some sort of stock "if I were dictator here's what I'd do" fantasy.  They suggest an eco-elite to run things, and an eco-religion to keep the masses in tune with genuine sustainability.  I don't agree with a lot of what they have to say -- especially their invocation of right-wing nonsense such as evolutionary psychology.  The authors also fail to examine the right-wing Republican content of the "tragedy of the commons" thesis (and you do know that Garrett Hardin was a Republican).  A genuine commons is one defended by the people, out of a commonly-shared notion of self-interest -- and it doesn't fall apart like Hardin said it would.  There is, you see, such a thing as genuinely collective people-power.  Hardin was obliged to alter his thesis after confronted by anthropologists with this fact.

Shearman and Smith fail to examine the possibility that dictatorship is the norm in historical society because of historical human subordination to various and sundry regimes of political economy such as the agricultural empires, feudalism, and capitalism. Ellen Meiksins Wood does a good job discussing this stuff -- her book "Democracy Against Capitalism" suggests that democracy is so feeble because capitalists keep it significantly out of the economic realm.  Conversely, dictatorship, the antithesis of democracy, emerges out of extra-democratic power, power not responsible to the people -- and, historically, extra-democratic power has not shown much caring for the environment (although Shearman and Smith can find a few compromised counter-examples).  The lack of dictatorial caring for the environment is not arbitrary -- the reason for this, I would argue, is that dictators are largely shaped by the paths they took in becoming dictators, and the process of becoming a dictator is antithetical to caring for mother Earth.   If placating financial interests is what you do to become King of the Mountain, then placating financial interests is what you're going to do when you're on top.

But it's not terribly hard to imagine Shearman and Smith's suggested future actually happening!  Corporate plutocracy will keep bumbling along, pulling those financial strings and quelling the occasional revolt or two, until even the major players are obliged by the resultant crisis atmosphere to stop and admit that they've used up the biosphere that used to support the enormous population they rule.  Then you have mass death, elite panic, and a late attempt by the apparatus serving the 1% to fulfill Shearman and Smith's vision.  Seems quite possible!

You know, if you you would like to see all this material about global warming and possible futures summarized, with a big scoop of eco-socialist optimism at the end, you should read the "Look Inside!" section of Hans A. Baer's (2012) Global Capitalism and Climate Change: The Need for an Alternative World System -- and also take a look at the Google Books version.  I don't know if you want to buy this book outright -- I'm sure Baer is a great guy and all, but the price they're asking for his book is not really all that legitimate.  The fact that Baer is only in hardback exacerbates this situation.  Capitalist bookselling, wouldn'tcha know.  

Baer goes through all of the above topics -- authoritarian solutions to environmental problems, the Kyoto Protocol and other business "solutions" to global warming, and so on.  It's easy to believe that Baer's solution -- ecosocialism -- is the correct one, it's just not easy to figure out how we're going to get there from here, which is why the Shearman and Smith book is so provocative and worth reading.  Anyhow, you can see from Baer's compilation of green and socialist initiatives toward the end of his book how "utopian" his positive alternative to Shearman and Smith's dictatorship really is.  The forces militating for a better world (i.e. ecosocialism) are still outnumbered, disorganized, and for the most part not even ideologically "there" yet.  We know now that Occupy was broken up by the FBI -- h/t to Bobswern's excellent diary -- how easy is it going to be for the next movement to assert itself?

Nonetheless we must imagine the positive futures as well, even if they don't really look like they're going to happen.  The point of this exercise is that we are to become our own science fiction writers.  We are to use our powers to break the spell of Hollywood space opera, and imagine a real future for ourselves.  The assembled intellectual powers of the establishment -- the secret teams, the military-industrial complex, the IMF/ World Bank/ WTO/ WEF quartet, the big meeting societies like the Council on Foreign Relations, the Trilateral Commission, the Bilderberg Group, the governments, the Fortune 500 and so on -- are not going to imagine our futures for us.  They have as a group completely failed to imagine a realistic future.  They fill in the blank space left behind by the disappearance of a future by inputting forty-year-old dreams.  They can't perform this act of imagination because they sit atop a system predicated through high-entropy domination, and their game is almost up.  Paul Krugman dawningly confronted this in Thursday's NYT.  "Is growth over?"  he asks.  

What do we know about the prospects for long-run prosperity? The answer is: less than we think.
The basis for the elite's hegemonic control over the masses is shrinking.  You could see this in this year's election, with the major parties' obvious appeal: "The other guy is worse."  Nobody is promising utopia anymore.  It's no longer believable.  Elections are all this crap about fear now.  The next political promise to disappear will be that of economic progress, as Krugman dawningly suggests.  

This isn't to say that those at the top aren't secure in their positions atop the pinnacles of the global economic and administrative hierarchies.  They are.  The thing to remember is that their power is ritualized.  The whole system is based on its continual, ritual, performance.  Eventually the dissent of the masses against this whole dreary ritual, in which we dig our own abrupt-climate-change-induced graves, will show up as a performance in its own right.  It has to.

(also at FDL)

Discuss
Reposted from War on Error by War on Error

Here's a pic of our group for those who might have missed our first meet up on Saturday.  We will be sitting at a table near the Salt Lake Roasting Company Cafe on the east end of the Urban Room (entrance) of the Salt Lake City Library.

Beneath the orange croissant is a copy of the original event posting.  Please let us know if you plan to attend so we will look for you.  I'll try the orange balloons again so you can find us although I miserably failed the last time.  And I might have a new orange scarf to wear..well coral colored on the orange side.

I think we will plan to gather at the movie entrance at 6:45 PM to try to get seats together.

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Reposted from War on Error by War on Error

I know we have some Kossacks in these area.  This could be a very hazardous weekend for travel.

Here's the report from NOAA.  I checked the weather tonight to see if Saturday would be a good day for our FIRST SLC KOSSACK Get Together.  It will be find, might want to bring an umbrella just in case.  Temp 57 degrees.

Here's the link for NOAA warnings.

Be safe, be prepared and stock up on what you need.  Stay tuned to weather warnings this weekend.

High winds, large precipitation events, possible flooding, wet, heavy snow could affect power.

I had to share this just in case our northern neighbors in Southern Idaho hadn't been alerted.

See you Saturday, brave SLC Kossacks, for our very first get together.

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Reposted from War on Error by War on Error

Here's a picture of where we will be meeting at the Red Butte Gardens, this coming Saturday, December 1st, at 2:00PM.  Roll the drums, the name of the room is

ORANGERIE!  How auspicious is that?!

Orangerie, Red Butte Gardens, Salt Lake City, Utah

I'm going to bring an orange balloon.  Also, I have sent each of you a message with my contact info.  Please let me know if you didn't receive it and I will resend.

I am so excited about meeting Utah Kossacks.  We are a rare breed, agree?

The meet up details are below, copy and pasted from original announcement.

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Reposted from War on Error by War on Error

HERE'S THE PLAN.  We will meet at 6:00 PM at the SALT LAKE ROASTING COMPANY CAFE IN the Library's Urban Room (the atrium entrance)  before the Movie, which begins at 7:00 PM.  There is parking beneath the library and TRAX has a drop off at the library.

The SLRCompany cafe is located on the east end of the Urban Room.  Here's a picture

The Urban Room, Salt Lake City Library

I couldn't wait, so I previewed the movie last Friday at the District Megaplex.  It's an amazing compilation of years of work with breathtaking photography.  

The Screening will be followed by a Q+A with director Jeff Orlowski, moderated by Doug Fabrizio, host of KUER’s RadioWest.*

Here's a trailer for this Sundance Film Festival, 2011 award winning show:

AMAZING TESTIMONY FROM AN O'REILLY DEVOTEE.  This is a great article about Chasing Ice

The new documentary "Chasing Ice" is life changing. The following video was included in the Alternet article.

Listen to this Bill O'Reilly devotee's reaction after seeing the movie.  She is literally heart broken to learn of earth's dire circumstances.  Psst Bill, you just lost a viewer/climate change denier:

Through the Lens: CHASING ICE

Event:  Through the Lens: CHASING ICE

Start:  December 5, 2012 7:00 PM

Cost:Free
Venue:  The City Library
Address:  210 E. 400 S., Salt Lake City, UT, 84111

Directed by Jeff Orlowski

75 min. | 2011 | USA

When National Geographic photographer James Balog asked, “How can one take a picture of climate change?” his attention was immediately drawn to ice. Soon he was asked to do a cover story on glaciers that became the most popular and well-read piece in the magazine during the last five years. But for Balog, that story marked the beginning of a much larger and longer-term project that would reach epic proportions.

In this breathtakingly beautiful documentary, filmmaker Jeff Orlowski follows the indomitable photographer as he brings to life the Extreme Ice Survey (EIS)—a massive photography project that placed 30 cameras across three continents to gather visual evidence of the Earth’s melting ice. Chasing Ice tells the story of a visionary artist who, in facing his own mortality, bequeaths the magic of photography and the adventure of the expedition to a new generation and captures the most visible sign of climate change on the planet today.

- Sundance Film Festival 2012 Film Guide

UDOT Trax goes right to the Library.  See Map here.

The website says TRAX runs until 11:30 PM.

You can call 1-888-RIDE-UTA if you need further information.

TRAX fares can be found here.

I will definitely be attending and shopping this week for an orange scarf.

* The library hours are listed as:

Phone: (801) 524-8200
Hours:   
Mon-Thu     9am–9pm**
Fri-Sat     9am–6pm
Sun     1–5pm
So I wonder if the Q+A session will run later?  And, if so, what does that means for those using the parking guarage.

Here's a phone number for the Salt Lake City Library if you have any questions - (801) 524-8200

See you there!

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Reposted from War on Error by War on Error

"If all power is in the people, if there is no higher law than their will, and if by counting their votes, their will may be ascertained--then the people may entrust all their power to anyone, and the power of the pretender and the usurper is then legitimate. It is not to be challenged since it came originally from the sovereign people."  Walter Lippman

Or is it?

Health and concience are the reasons I hardly spend any money on anything other than the very basics.

Both health and conscience keep me out of most stores and restaurants.

We have known for a long time that eternal growth/greed drives corporate ethos/pathos.  However, the veil has been lifted a bit higher since the election, oddly by loud mouthed CEOs themselves.  

Yes, their ideology and policies trickle down to the financially struggling employees at the bottom of their corporate structures.  One is left to conclude that these uber wealthy billionaires and millionaires, socially insulated, seemingly sociopathic CEOs have little, if any, conscience and/or concern for how their ideologies and/or policies affect the lives of the real people who work for them so that $Billions/Millions can trickle up into their bulging personal wealth portfolios.

FOOD:  Both health and conscience keep me from patronizing chain food outlets.  The high salt content, and heaven knows what else, makes me feel sick and lethargic.  Fast food:  I never eat it because they overwork and underpay their employees.  I learned this first hand, story below.*

When I go out to eat (rarely), I go to locally owned ethnic eateries that are both delicious and healthy.  Also, I can ask for and receive good food with no salt and/or msg.

CLOTHING:  Unlike many consumers, I find no pleasure in the ability to buy clothing at very low prices.  I am haunted by mental pictures of the children who are more slaves than employees of the behemoths demanding 110% or more output year after year.  I decided years ago that what I had, if I took good care, could last me a very, very long time.  I rarely buy clothing, except for the requisite new shirt in the spring and winter for social outings.

I understand that cheap clothing is a boon for so many parents who must reclothe their growing children.  The majority of Americans are not paid a living wage, forcing both mom and dad to work, and every dollar that isn't eaten up by the costs of housing, utilities, gas, and medical expenses has to be stretched.

Taxes Median Income

*THE STORY:  I will share that I did an experiment a couple of years ago.  I applied for and got a job at the Wendy's a few blocks from my home.  I didn't need a job but I wanted to learn what it was like for employees.  

I met Karla who had worked for this same Wendy's for 8 years.  She reluctantly trained me.  I say reluctantly because she was not a manager - "It's not my job to train you" she said.  So I made a deal with her.  We bartered.  I paid Karla $25 to train me.  We became friends.  She was 29, suffered greatly from fibromyalgia, and still lived with her parents.  Karla had given up any dream of having a good life in this, the greatest country on earth.  She was also a very kind, quiet, clean living, good person.  Wendy's could have cared less about Karla.

Here's what I found.  Karla's wage had maxed out at $8.25 an hour years before.  There was no increase in pay because of Corporate wage policies.  Stress makes fibromyalgia worse, so a move up to management wasn't an option for Karla.  I guess legally, and especially in our Right to Work state, this policy is A ok in America.

The pace workers had to work at was beyond frenetic, even grueling.  It was a VERY stressful job on top of being physically demanding.  Standing and shuffling, heavy lifting, for hours at a time is very tiring.

At age 60, I wasn't fast enough, so I got to man the register for the indoor customers which included getting the salads, drinks, shakes, and chili together for those orders including the same.  During the busy lunch hour, I endured the wrath of many customers, lined up 10-15 deep, who couldn't quite understand why the Fast Food wasn't faster, or fast enough to satisfy their fantasies about fast food.

Mental chaos.  While acting as the PR front person at the cash register, about 25% of my brain had to tune into the loud, order snapping, often chastising managers and the curt reponses of those they were chastising so I would know if the order for the irate customer standing in front of me was, in fact, on its way.

After the noon slam, I the register operator, was also responsible for cleaning the tables, windows, doors,  bathrooms, walls, window sills, sweeping/mopping the floors, and picking up trash outside.

THE NEW AMERICANA:

I also got to know the store manager very well.  He was only 19, salaried at about $30K but required to work 60-70 hours a week. He was amazingly fast, bright, and patient (unlike his supervisors).  In another life, I could envision him graduating from Stanford or Harvard but he and his equally bright high school sweetheart started their family early so they married and buckled down to the job of being responsible parents.

The insurance was pretty good, but when he and his new wife had a $500,000 premie, they had to pay approximately $50,000 of the expense. Imagine that.  19 years old with $50,000 in medical bills to pay.  These kids had integrity.  They tossed their plans of continuing education to pay the medical bills instead.

Of course, the medical bills required his wife to work full-time after the child survived ICU and 6 months at home.  His wife now works for a fast food outlet, too, as a manager (same corporation, different name outlet).  They both are required to work 60-70 hours a week.  Thankfully, her grandparents were/are happy to raise their child who literally sleeps/lives at the grandparents home 5 nights a week.  This miracle child still requires a lot of medical attention, the mom's health is declining, and not a month goes by that this young couple doesn't have to pay their share of medical bills.

This child is deprived of parents because a corporation demands 90% of her parents' lives in return for jobs that don't pay enough to support her otherwise.

Shameful!

I often wonder if this young couple will live to be 65 or 67 or whatever the age for retirement for them will be someday.  I also wonder at what age they will be deemed "outside the corporate picture" of "what a manager's profile" has to look like.  Where will they end up if they survive years of this stress?

I lasted 3 months as the register lady at Wendy's, but I learned enough to satisfy my curiousity and I won't give a dime of my sufficient, but limited, funds to fast food restaurants.

I found fast food to be an inhumane work environment.

CONCLUSION:

Like you, I know history.  I know people suffered, even died, to secure safe and reasonable working conditions in the USA.

The 40 hour work week became law.  My friend, the Wendy's manager isn't paid overtime.  

The men and women working for restaurant and retail chains can thank the Bush administration and the Tom DeLay Rubber Stamp Congress for not being paid overtime, even though they are required to work 10, 20, even 30 hours more than 40 hours a week or 50, 60, and even 70 hours a week.

On August 23, 2004, controversial changes to the FLSA's overtime regulations went into effect, making substantial modifications to the definition of an "exempt" employee. Low-level working supervisors throughout American industries were reclassified as “executives” and lost overtime rights.

These changes were sought by business interests and the Bush administration, which claimed that the laws needed clarification and that few workers would be affected. The Bush administration called the new regulations "FairPay." But other organizations, such as the AFL-CIO, claimed the changes would make millions of additional workers ineligible to obtain relief under the FLSA for overtime pay. Attempts in Congress to overturn the new regulations were unsuccessful.

I think you and I both know that, until the majority of consumers in this country STOP cooperating by giving our hard earned cash to these inhumane businesses so the top brass can live in luxury while paying non-living wages to the masses while requiring people running the day-to-day operations to work 60-70 hours a week, conditions and wages will only get worse.

It's beyond time for a national strike.  

The combination of no limits on working hours, the open-24/7 retail outlets, the evisceration of union labor, and the complicity of both consumers and workers too afraid to rock the boat are creating

GENERATIONS OF CHILDREN being deprived of a cohesive home/family life.

The hypocricy of the so-called CHRISTIAN CONSERVATIVES, who seem to stand up more for corporate rights than the rights of parents and children, makes my head hurt.

They have lost their moral compass.  We hear them say, over and over again, that the foundation of America is the family, but the NEW AMERICANA as stated above is destroying what we used to think of as family life.

Yes, strikes and withholding spending will cause hardships, but I think the hardships will be worse if the private equity firms and corporate behemoths continue to succeed at the expense of everyone else.  In time, they will collude and we will find a majority of people unable to live healthy, productive lives.

Well, they are colluding already.  We need to understand the long-term ramifications if this collusion continues without disruption from US.

With a world of cheap labor that can be forced to work by their governments, AND millions of new "stuff consumers" in other countries, can we say it out loud?  THEY DON'T NEED US ANYMORE!

So, as you reach for that next bargain remember the children whose sweat created it.

As you pull up to the drive-through window for some Fast Food, remember the miracle child who fought for her life in ICU, only to survive to rarely enjoy quality time with her depleted, exhausted mom and dad.

Americans and others in the western world have the power of the purse to create change.  Will we?

Maybe this Christmas, we can ask our family members what their favorite charity is?  Or a family could commit to a portion of the money spent on stuff to be contributed to a local food bank or a neighbor in need?

The power of the purse has many options.  We can be creative.

Poll

If Americans don't take a stand and unite to affect change, who will?

13%3 votes
21%5 votes
13%3 votes
13%3 votes
8%2 votes
30%7 votes

| 23 votes | Vote | Results

Discuss
Reposted from War on Error by War on Error Editor's Note: It's time to show up, I think. -- War on Error

This was released on November 19th.  

Senate District 2 Debate to be Hosted by ABU Education Fund and Alliance for a Better UTAH on Tuesday, November 27

ABU Education Fun is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to education and advocacy of progressive ideas and causes.

Who: Max Roth, Fox13 News reporter (Debate Moderator)
Candidates:
Jim Dabakis
Brian Doughty
Will Carlson
Robert Comstock
Peter Corroon
Mark Martinez
Jon Watkins
Jenny Wilson
*Current as of November 19

What: The ABU Education Fund, an affiliate of Alliance for a Better UTAH, will host a debate between candidates vying for the State Senate District 2 seat on Tuesday, November 27. The seat was recently vacated by County Mayor-elect Ben McAdams. A special election will be held Saturday, December 1.

Where: Utah Museum of Fine Arts, Katherine W. and Ezekiel R. Dumke, Jr. Auditorium
Directions available here:

Poll

Are you planning on attending?

100%1 votes
0%0 votes

| 1 votes | Vote | Results

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Reposted from War on Error by War on Error Editor's Note: Hope you can attend. -- War on Error

Here's another great opportunity to meet up, make some new friends, and see this amazing movie.  It being the holiday season, some won't be able to attend the Dec 1st Holiday meet up so I thought this might be another great opportunity.  

I definitely want to see this movie, and the price (free) is definitely doable.

Let me know below if you want to attend and we can make plans to meet up 1/2 hour before showtime.

Here's a trailer for this Sundance Film Festival, 2011 award winning show:

WOW!  The Screening will be followed by a Q+A with director Jeff Orlowski, moderated by Doug Fabrizio, host of KUER’s RadioWest.*

Through the Lens: CHASING ICE

Event:  Through the Lens: CHASING ICE

Start:  December 5, 2012 7:00 PM

Cost:Free
Venue:  The City Library
Address:  210 E. 400 S., Salt Lake City, UT, 84111

Directed by Jeff Orlowski

75 min. | 2011 | USA

When National Geographic photographer James Balog asked, “How can one take a picture of climate change?” his attention was immediately drawn to ice. Soon he was asked to do a cover story on glaciers that became the most popular and well-read piece in the magazine during the last five years. But for Balog, that story marked the beginning of a much larger and longer-term project that would reach epic proportions.

In this breathtakingly beautiful documentary, filmmaker Jeff Orlowski follows the indomitable photographer as he brings to life the Extreme Ice Survey (EIS)—a massive photography project that placed 30 cameras across three continents to gather visual evidence of the Earth’s melting ice. Chasing Ice tells the story of a visionary artist who, in facing his own mortality, bequeaths the magic of photography and the adventure of the expedition to a new generation and captures the most visible sign of climate change on the planet today.

- Sundance Film Festival 2012 Film Guide

UDOT Trax goes right to the Library.  See Map here.

The website says TRAX runs until 11:30 PM.

You can call 1-888-RIDE-UTA if you need further information.

TRAX fares can be found here.

I will definitely be attending and shopping this week for an orange scarf.

* The library hours are listed as:

Phone: (801) 524-8200
Hours:   
Mon-Thu     9am–9pm**
Fri-Sat     9am–6pm
Sun     1–5pm
So I wonder if the Q+A session will run later?  And, if so, what does that means for those using the parking guarage.

Here's a phone number if you have any questions - (801) 524-8200

See you there!

Poll

I will be there

75%3 votes
25%1 votes

| 4 votes | Vote | Results

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