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Reposted from researchandanalyze by kalmoth Editor's Note: Important. -- kalmoth

Agence France-Presse reports a large protest demonstration in Moscow today with marchers carrying placards that said, "Putin, get out of Ukraine."

"A group of demonstrators held a banner reading: "Take the Russian troops home."

Moscow Peace Protest
Russian opposition leader, Boris Nemtsov, at Moscow protest against Russia's military action in Crimea.
Moscow protesters March 15 2014
Moscow protesters carry Ukrainian and Russian flags.
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Fri Feb 28, 2014 at 10:45 AM PST

Cold Duck (Photo Diary)

by Ojibwa

Reposted from Shutterbugs by kalmoth Editor's Note: Ducks! -- kalmoth

 photo DSCN1621_zpsb445f1fe.jpg

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Mon Nov 11, 2013 at 07:34 PM PST

Top Comments - Poor, Poor, Pitiful Me

by BeninSC

Reposted from Top Comments by Dave in Northridge

TopCommentsRedux

Of course, it is a Warren Zevon song, but many feel that Linda Ronstadt took the song to the next level. Here is a video of Linda R. performing Poor, Poor, Pitiful Me.

More below! But, first, a word from our sponsor ...

Top Comments recognizes the previous day's Top Mojo and strives to promote each day's outstanding comments through nominations made by Kossacks like you. Please send comments (before 9:30pm ET) by email to topcomments@gmail.com or by our KosMail message board. Just click on the Spinning Top to make a submission. Look for the Spinning Top to pop up in diaries around Daily Kos.

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Reposted from StellaRay by GoGoGoEverton

Just a very quick diary to say THEY DID NOT CAVE. The president did not cave, the Democrats did not cave. And I will note, that there were several here who feared they would. In fact, I will mention just one on many comments in response to someone who said the president and the democrats wouldn't cave, that asked if they could bookmark the comment...in other words, to come back and prove that person wrong.

And I understand. The president made mistakes back in 2011, during the last crisis of this sort. And to those of us who have been around for awhile, we understand that even good presidents make mistakes. The good news is he seemed to have learned. And when he learns, Reid learns, and so does the rest of the democratic party.

We. Did. Not. Cave. And no matter what happens from here on, and I'm one to say I don't think there's going to be ANY caving going on, including the upcoming Debt ceiling issue, I want to BOOKMARK this moment in time. The president did not cave.
the Democrats did not cave.

And so, as we head into this government shut down, we should damn well know we did something right, and we should pause and reflect on the possibility of that. And we should pause and ask ourselves if we really believe both parties are the same.

Tomorrow and the day after will be another day, and days after that, and there will be the usual alligator wrestling going on here, how freaking imperfect we are.

But for tonight, I just wish to put it on record here. The President did not cave. The Democrats did not cave. And everyone savoring that bitter taste in their mouth, is just going to have to add a bit of sweet fact.  

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Reposted from JosephK74 by kalmoth Editor's Note: Needs more exposure, very thoughtful. -- kalmoth

This diary began as a comment responding to a comment in Ray Pensador's most recent diary on how propaganda controls people and ballooned into a diary of its own.  While I do not at all discount the power of propaganda-- or, as it's called in critical theory circles, "ideology" --to control people, I do think we have a tendency to overestimate the power of distorted beliefs to control people, thereby overlooking far more powerful things that compel people to tolerate oppressive conditions.  If this is true, then it has significant implications for what political activism should be engaged in seeking to produce a more just and equitable society.  Follow me below the fold to see what I have in mind.

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Reposted from Top Comments by Dave in Northridge

TopCommentsRedux

Anyone who can read my kos ‘handle’ knows I live in one of the reddest states around. My friend, Dave in Northridge, issued a challenge to red state residents ..., and so I am writing, with that inspiration!

It is not easy to live in a very red state. Things happen on a regular basis that deeply offend the sense of justice. Political outrages, encounters with very close-minded, often bigoted people and their behaviors ... People who vote as far from their personal interest as possible for the sake of hate or victimhood or class jealousies. Hard things to watch. Hard things to stomach. Hard things to cope with.

More below! But, first, a word from our sponsor ...

Top Comments recognizes the previous day's Top Mojo and strives to promote each day's outstanding comments through nominations made by Kossacks like you. Please send comments (before 9:30pm ET) by email to topcomments@gmail.com or by our KosMail message board. Just click on the Spinning Top to make a submission. Look for the Spinning Top to pop up in diaries around Daily Kos.

Make sure that you include the direct link to the comment (the URL), which is available by clicking on that comment's date/time. Please let us know your Daily Kos user name if you use email so we can credit you properly. If you send a writeup with the link, we can include that as well. The diarist reserves the right to edit all content.

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Reposted from Bob Johnson by kalmoth Editor's Note: Because socks. -- kalmoth

Take this simple test to determine if you are, indeed, a sockpuppet.

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Reposted from shortfinals by kalmoth Editor's Note: I love this diary series! -- kalmoth

640 Mosquito B.35 Cosford photo 640B35Cosford.jpg

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Reposted from smoothnmellow by kalmoth Editor's Note: Deserves more exposure. -- kalmoth

This will be short.

Ahem, what's happening to us?  Did President Obama's remarks on Friday set this current round off? I truly hope not because the phrase 'there's no place left for us' sounds eerily and disturbingly familiar and not in a good way at all.

This will be very short because for the second danggone time, I accidentally deleted a draft.  GRRRRRRRRRRR.  I'm not used to this diary making stuff, especially 2 in one day, but this has to be said now.

IMO, right now the difference between us Progressives and the Tea Party is that for them, dysfunction works well because it's cohesive.

Dysfunctional Progressives is not cohesive with us and that is why we collectively fail.  

While we persist in having these round robin arguments over who as a Progressive has been more hurt, the right has taken its most delusional discussions that should have stayed behind closed doors after the Civil Rights Era and moved them to the state houses and into Congress, fueled by equally delusional people and institutions with way too much time and money on their hands.  

This is why Trayvon Martin is dead right now -- thanks in part to the delusional laws passed by delusional public officials who were elected by delusional citizens who are under the delusion that they speak for the majority in this country.

And we debate on Daily Kos who has the right to be more hurt.

The truth is that there are a lot of folk on here who are 'disillusioned' because they have been hurt.  Not to acknowledge this would be unfair to them and to everyone else here on DK.

They are hurting and have been hurting for some time.  Take away the skin color and the policies that are causing this pain is a hurt we all as Progressives can understand.  That is why diaries like the one that is on the rec list now are consistently supported by the same individuals day in and day out.

I challenged the diarist on today's rec list to view this a little differently:

You are wrong because I agree with you.  Just because I don't choose to take the tone that you and others do about President Obama doesn't mean that I do not take note of what's going on here.  It is not white privilege to complain about government abuse.  That is simply absurd.

It is EVERYONE'S privilege to do so, just like it is everyone's privilege to acknowledge what the government gets right.

Or not.  But don't hang your argument on race like this because you don't do yourself any favors by protesting in isolation, because that is where you will end up.

Marginalizing yourself out of the equation of solutions.

The problem right now in this country is that our collective sense of cynicism, indifference, anger and lack of collective focus as Progressives is why we fail.  I think that being pure to your word IS A GOOD THING.  It keeps us targeted.

But being pure in isolation is extremism because you don't possess the tools to be persuasive without being equally annoying to offensive.  That is the real problem with your argument.

Now it is up to you how you choose to receive what I said.  You can either figure out a way to help Progressives build a better, more cohesive and inclusive coalition or you can build yourself an island and shout from the distance.

If we as Progressive don't find a way to talk to one another better than this, then we ALL will be on separate islands shouting from the distance while the Tea Party and its insanity agenda takes us over.

This here on here on DK -- has got to stop.

UPDATE important: Oh wow.  Okay.  Thanks for those who have explained what the hell happened here.  Apparently Markos made a comment about white privilege in one of his diaries and I'm going to find it and read it.  I don't want to comment further until I've read it myself.

I will not call the diarist out by handle, but I think he would do well to update his diary to reflect that he is reacting to this because we could do without this level of  community deterioration that is now going on in that diary.

Discuss

Wed Jul 17, 2013 at 09:06 AM PDT

'Curious' George (Zimmerman)

by Ian Reifowitz

Reposted from Ian Reifowitz by Ian Reifowitz
200 people marched peacefully in San Francisco, Calif., Saturday night, July 13, 2013 protesting George Zimmerman's acquittal hours earlier in a Florida courtroom. The march lasted for two hours through the city's Mission District. (Karl Mondon/Bay Area N
As many of you have done these past few days, I've been discussing George Zimmerman and Trayvon Martin with people I know, mostly online. One of these people claimed that Zimmerman called the cops and then got out of his car and followed Martin because he was "curious" and "concerned."

Curious George. That's all he was. A concerned citizen. A curious one. Not a menace. Not a would be vigilante, or a wannabe cop who followed someone even though the neighborhood watch rules in Sanford, Florida, say don't engage and don't follow, call the cops and stand aside. Just curious.

Curious George.

Curious is one way to describe his actions. I'll let you all imagine some other adjectives.

The person with whom I was discussing the case asked me to imagine what Curious George must have felt, living in a neighborhood where there had been a string of burglaries recently, apparently committed by young black men. I replied, okay, now you do some imagining for me:

Imagine being a black teenager in a society where every time you went out someone called the cops, and the cops came and followed you. Every time. Or, even worse, if someone without a badge or a uniform got "curious" and followed you for 3, or 4, or 5 blocks?

Imagine how you'd feel if every time you went out, some non-black person treated you like a possible or even probable criminal (and that's how "curious George" treated Trayvon Martin), even if you were the law abiding person you are? After all, if it's okay for Zimmerman to have done it, why wouldn't it be okay for it to happen all the time? Would that be sustainable as a society?

Would you, in response to this kind of treatment, say to yourself?:

"Well, people who have the same skin color as I do commit violent crimes at a higher percentage than other people—even though of course the overwhelming majority of black people and even young black men don't commit any violent crimes at all, and comparatively few of those are committed against random strangers of another race—but despite those details of course you're justified in assuming I'm likely about to commit a crime no matter what I really am. I totally understand your fears and take no personal offense. Have a lovely day. I'll just get down on my knees and put my hands up now so there's no confusion."

There was no response to those questions.

I understand what it's like to be white, to think about crime and want to do what I can to protect my family and neighbors. Of course, every American of every race thinks about these things. But the answer cannot be—on the basis of one's curiosity—to treat every black person, or every young black male as a probable criminal.

It's counterproductive, immoral, and, oh yeah, the Constitution gives them the same rights and freedoms it does me.

Discuss
Reposted from Animal Nuz by GoGoGoEverton

From The New York Times:

Individuals buying health insurance on their own will see their premiums tumble next year in New York State as changes under the federal health care law take effect, state officials are to announce on Wednesday.

State insurance regulators say they have approved rates for 2014 that are at least 50 percent lower on average than those currently available in New York. Beginning in October, individuals in New York City who now pay $1,000 a month or more for coverage will be able to shop for health insurance for as little as $308 monthly. With federal subsidies, the cost will be even lower.

Supporters of the new health care law, the Affordable Care Act, credited the drop in rates to the online purchasing exchanges the law created, which they say are spurring competition among insurers that are anticipating an influx of new customers. The law requires that an exchange be started in every state.

http://www.nytimes.com/...
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Mon Jul 15, 2013 at 03:12 PM PDT

Judgment day

by Ian Reifowitz

Reposted from Ian Reifowitz by Ian Reifowitz
Daily News (NY) cover, July 15, 2013
Today, about 36 hours after I heard that George Zimmerman was acquitted of killing Trayvon Martin, I was running -- not sprinting, it is 90 plus degrees here in New York -- to catch a bus. It was sitting at a stop, about half a block ahead of me. The last passenger had boarded, and the driver had closed the doors. By all rights, he could have pulled away from the stop and drove off. Being an experienced mass transit user, I decided to maximize my chances of making the bus by getting myself parallel to it, in the sightline of the driver's side view mirror, and loped toward the doors. I even gave a little wave, hoping to catch his attention. To my good fortune, I saw the doors open up. I clambered aboard and thanked him for waiting. On other similar occasions, I've watched drivers pull away, so I was pretty happy, especially given the heat.

The driver was a young black man. Early twenties, I'd say. He smiled and said, "At first I thought you were just out for a jog." I think he was playing a bit, but I'm not 100% sure. Either way, there was genuine warmth in his smile. "But when you waved, I figured you wanted a ride," he added. Then my Metrocard showed an error when I tried to pay, and he laughed and said, "Go on ahead and sit down."

As I did I was in a terrific mood, buoyed both by my success as a commuter and by the pleasant exchange with a generous stranger. Then I thought about Trayvon Martin. I thought about how the bus driver had cut me a break, had treated me like a human being, had not judged me, or thought me hostile to him because I'm white and he's black. That's how we are all supposed to treat each other. I'm supposed to treat you the same way, extend you the same courtesy, hold you to the same standards no matter your color or gender or whatever I can tell about you from your outward appearance. And that's how you are supposed to treat me.

But that's not how George Zimmerman treated Trayvon Martin, how he assessed Trayvon as he watched the young man from his car. Zimmerman simply prejudged him. We know what was going through Zimmerman's mind, what he thought of Trayvon Martin. "F------ punks. These a-------. They always get away."

What made Zimmerman prejudge Martin, what made him decide that Trayvon was suspicious? The fact is, there was absolutely nothing suspicious about what Trayvon Martin was doing that night as he walked home. Nothing. There was no legitimate reason for George Zimmerman to be suspicious of him. Nothing at all.

Other than one thing.

Zimmerman was suspicious because Trayvon Martin was a black teenager. Young, black, male. What else about his appearance was suspicious? That he was not wearing a suit and tie? Martin was doing nothing wrong, and had as much right to be there in that neighborhood as Zimmerman, its erstwhile "watchman." Zimmerman determined he was suspicious and followed him. Had that not happened, had Zimmerman stayed in his car -- which he almost certainly would have done had he seen a light-skinned, non-black kid walking instead of a black teenager, Trayvon Martin would be alive today.

This isn't about the verdict, or at least not just about it. As Ta-Nehisi Coates explained in his brilliant analysis, the verdict may well be the correct one based on the way the law is written, given the lack of eyewitnesses. But as Coates' essay makes clear, this case is above all about the fact that all too often in our country young black men, and black people in general, are prejudged by their fellow Americans in a way that leads to them suffering direct harm. Yes, it's about racism.

Yesterday was George Zimmerman's judgment day, at least as far as our criminal courts are concerned. He was acquitted by a jury of his peers. But Trayvon Martin's judgment day took place on February 26, 2012. On that night he was judged "suspicious" by a jury of one, and the evidence was as plain as the skin on his face.

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