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View Diary: Why is Chris Hedges calling for "boots on the ground" in Libya? (72 comments)

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  •  former military intel officer pat lang (1+ / 0-)
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    Clay Claiborne

    has a blog where veterans discuss their experiences. here one explains that x number of sorties doesn't always mean a target was engaged.

    http://turcopolier.typepad.com/...

    Those who profess to favor freedom and yet depreciate agitation…want rain without thunder and lightening...Power [including obama] concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will. ~ Frederick Douglass

    by stolen water on Sun Sep 18, 2011 at 11:52:51 PM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  A very informative piece, thanks (1+ / 0-)
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      stolen water

      I would just like to point out his conclusion:

      If anyone still harbors thought of the victorious rebels marching into Tripoli behind a steamroller of airpower, the numbers game should disabuse them of this vision.

       Modern tactical airpower is precise, surgical, and deadly, but the support of the type being provided—numerically small and tailored to limit collateral damage—is not going to provide an offensive advantage for the under-trained and under armed Libyan rebels. They may still win, because if the support missions continue, they are a kind of safety net, but it may take a very long time. The alternative is that an attack against a legitimate command and control target may provide a de facto decapitation, and a swift end.

       That would be luck. Otherwise we surely must be thinking about someone’s boots on the ground if we continue to expect a military solution to the situation.


      Guess he was wrong about "boots on the ground" This was a Libyan victory.

      Remember history, Clay Claiborne, Director Vietnam: American Holocaust - narrated by Martin Sheen

      by Clay Claiborne on Mon Sep 19, 2011 at 12:21:55 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Very good piece - it speaks the truth (0+ / 0-)
        They may still win, because if the support missions continue, they are a kind of safety net, but it may take a very long time. The alternative is that an attack against a legitimate command and control target may provide a de facto decapitation, and a swift end.

        Note that this was posted May 2, 2011. NATO started using Apache strike helicopters for close air support on May 4.

        It still took 6 months of NATO attacks to gain Tripoli and the fighting is still not over. This is a long time. Obama said Libya action would last 'days, not weeks'.

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