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View Diary: At least make it easy for hardworking Americans to create FOOD (105 comments)

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  •  you ain't whistling dixie, doc (5+ / 0-)

    despite my pastoral ode above, I have learned that lesson, too. Growing food is not a simple task.
    I didn't necessarily want to learn about powdery mildew, Early Blight, Asparagus beetles, cabbage moths, soil pH, calcium deficiencies, and more, but it goes with the territory.
    (If you treat your lawn, and the trees are in it or nearby, don't eat the fruit under any circumstances. Chemicals could be one reason for poor fruiting. Of course, it could be a nitrogen issue, lack of pollinating insects, poorly draining soil...)

    Class war has consequences, and we are living them.

    by kamarvt on Wed Sep 28, 2011 at 06:26:20 AM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  It is all about your soil (4+ / 0-)

      Healthy soil, with alot of composted leaves and some well rotted manure will produce a bumper crop.

      Try this- in the fall, designate a new garden patch.
      Pile leaves- anything but oak- much too acid and takes years to break down- a foot thick over newspaper covered with a couple of inches of fresh or rotted manure.
      Cover with a tarp, until freezing, if you live in a windy area.
      Remove tarp and let the winter snow and rain work their magic.

      Next spring, do not till- tilling destroys the soil structure.
      Plant your seedlings down thru the semi- rotted leaves.
       You will have a fantastic garden- check moisture and water with soaker hose laid on the surface.

      Try to disturb the soil in your garden as little as possible- this method can be used to rehabilitate a spent garden space.
      Leaves are solid gold.

      •  ah, yes. comforter compost. (3+ / 0-)

        there are some great names for different types of piles (Hospital Heap is one of my faves). That's the next step for the corn patch I've begun making by suffocating the grass. No-till makes a lot of sense, but since my space is limited, I cannot rotate crops, and so I have problems with plant diseases. I generally rotate the soil, and add finished compost to revitalize. I'm also pretty good about testing the soil, so I have an idea where the pH is, nutrient levels, etc.
        No problem getting leaves in VT right about now, either. Maybe I can sell tickets to my compost pile to the tourists...

        Oh, yeah; tourists? We fixed our roads, and most of the bridges, too. What Are You Waiting For?!?

        Class war has consequences, and we are living them.

        by kamarvt on Wed Sep 28, 2011 at 08:36:41 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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