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View Diary: NYT Lead: U.S. Law Enforcement Made 1.3 Million+ Surveillance Requests Of Cell Carriers In 2011 (42 comments)

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  •  Arguing about use of an adjective, "explosion"... (0+ / 0-)

    ...is a typical ploy of a commenter that's on the wrong side of an issue, while attempting to obfuscate the greater truth, which (in this case) is that their argument(s) isn't substantial (in this case, at all).

    Again, in 2011 there were more than 1.3 million requests for surveillance/surveillance-related information made by U.S. law enforcement (and related) authorities, with a substantial portion of those requests circumventing/skirting proper channels, and propriety, in general.

    These are facts...no matter how much you may attempt to trivialize them. Has this practice been going on since well before 2011? Most certainly; no surprise there.

    Is the public aware of the extent of this massive trampling of its privacy? I don't think so.

    "I always thought if you worked hard enough and tried hard enough, things would work out. I was wrong." --Katharine Graham

    by bobswern on Mon Jul 09, 2012 at 02:39:11 PM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  so, I put more statistical analysis into a blog (0+ / 0-)

      comment than the NY Times puts into its entire front page article and you are going to dismiss it all because I commented on their adjective usage? Jolly good!

      I wouldn't categorize 911 call center requests, fully 25% of the number using AT&T as a guide, as "surveillance."

      with a substantial portion of those requests circumventing/skirting proper channels
      Do you have ANY evidence to support this claim? Any? Can you define "substantial portion"? According to AT&T, only 5% of requests were not backed up by either a subpoena, a warrant, or came from a recognized 911 call center. Is that what you mean by "substantial"?

      There were 330 million cell phone subscribers in the US last year. Even if you assumed that all of the 1.3 million requests were for a different subscriber, that's only 0.4% of all subscribers.

      But anyway - it's a poorly written, vaguely sensationalist article that distorts the facts as given by the wireless carriers. You can rant at me all you want but it isn't going to change that. I've worked for years on privacy concerns and internet security. I'm a certified security professional. There are some seriously major issues out there. This article does an extremely poor job of describing one of the minor ones.

      Have a nice day!

      •  I just concluded a tech security consulting gig... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        BradyB

        ...for a Russell 2000 (Index) firm. I also own a software business that, among a few other things, specializes in automated underwriting and credit analytics. Neither of these facts are all that relevant (vaguely/tangentially, at best)  to the matters discussed herein, frankly. As far as stats go, I would suggest that you take a look at the chart/graph that accompanies the NYT article (in the original piece). It CLEARLY (and graphically) demonstrates a statistical "explosion" in cell-tracking/surveillance over the past few years.

        I will say, somewhat contradicting my words at the beginning of this comment, that I've personally witnessed law enforcement utilizing the Patriot Act to implement surveillance (both Internet and cellphone) on at least one individual for what was little more than a very low-grade felony (in the private sector), or, more likely, a higher-level petty crime. And, it was made abundantly clear to me at the time that this was standard operating procedure in local law enforcement (pretty much throughout the land; and it had nothing, whatsoever, to do with national security). This episode occurred at the beginning of 2011, I might add.

        "I always thought if you worked hard enough and tried hard enough, things would work out. I was wrong." --Katharine Graham

        by bobswern on Mon Jul 09, 2012 at 04:37:32 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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