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View Diary: no blood for oil (20 comments)

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  •  For you to call the elected Libyan government (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Cynical Copper, angry marmot, killjoy

    "the new dictators" makes it perfectly clear who does, and does not, understand what is happening in Libya.

    Art is the handmaid of human good.

    by joe from Lowell on Sun Jul 22, 2012 at 08:09:22 AM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  Can Libya's Liberals and Islamists Get Along? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Shawn Russell
      Can Libya's Liberals and Islamists Get Along?
      Jul 21 2012

      You might think, based on the headlines in the Western press, that Libya's July 7 vote delivered a resounding victory for the country's liberals.
      ...
      But axiom "all politics is local" is true in Libya as well, and what Jibril's candidates have most in common is not by any secular-liberalism or lack thereof, but deep local roots. It seems that in some urban areas, based on my conversations with people in Libya, that voters selected Jibril's candidate assuming he or she would share Jibril's views, only later discovering that this was not the case. Some local candidates seem to have bandwagoned on Jibril's name and popularity, without actually holding his liberal or secularist views. The same thing appears true of many candidates on the so-called "independents" list.
      ...
      Libyan politics, then, are still fragmented and fluid; it's far too soon to declare victory for liberals or for anyone else. The political landscape is in some ways like the security situation, which is primarily enforced not by unified national army or police, but by a few dozen independent, locally organized militias.
      ...
      Yet the transitional leadership has been embroiled in a fight over which governmental body will even be in charge of writing the constitution. With the Libya struggling to resolve even these procedural matters, which are important but less ideological charged than the looming debates over the actual contents of the constitution, the newly elected government may have a harder time establishing the post-Qaddafi era than many observers think.
      ...

      •  It's still a very fluid situation. (0+ / 0-)

        But the different sides are working it out in the political sphere so far.  Just look at how long the Americans had to work at it before settling on an enduring constitution.

        I wish the effort to build an enduring democracy got as much attention as the effort to take down the old dictatorship.

        Art is the handmaid of human good.

        by joe from Lowell on Mon Jul 23, 2012 at 08:47:24 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  sure (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Shawn Russell, BradyB

      the same  Libyan government that tolerates  torture, war crimes and other atrocities by friendly criminal gangs and factions.   And it is not me who says that.   It is Amnesty International.  

      Last time I checked democracies dont allow torture and war crimes.   Only dictators do.   Like in the new Libya.

      •  No, it's not. (0+ / 0-)

        The Libyan government is struggling to assert its authority over the country, while militias are often able to operate with impunity.  You don't even seem to know the difference.  Or care, as long as you can keep slandering the government.

        Someone who actually wanted to see the country become peaceful would be rooting for the government as it works to expand its capacity.  That is, someone unlike you.

         

        Art is the handmaid of human good.

        by joe from Lowell on Mon Jul 23, 2012 at 08:51:23 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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