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View Diary: When Is a Bike Not A Bicycle? (41 comments)

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  •  Good lord, are you that defensive? (0+ / 0-)

    I have ridden both conventional bikes and an e bike. The e bike is less maneuverable. Period.

    Does everything have to be fight with you?

    Jeez...

    •  "defensive driving" is always a smart idea. (0+ / 0-)

      Though I prefer the phrase "driving aware."

      The e-bike plus rider, is equally maneuverable as any other combination of bike, rider, and cargo having equal mass.  

      Try this: weigh an e-bike, and weigh your regular bike.  Now add a quantity of weight to your regular bike to make it weigh as much as the e-bike.  Now do comparable road tests.

      Your arguement isn't with me, it's with Isaac Newton, and he has a way of winning those arguements.  

      "Minus two votes for the Republican" equals "plus one vote for the Democrat." Arithmetic doesn't care about their feelings either!

      by G2geek on Wed Oct 03, 2012 at 02:02:42 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I weigh the same no matter which bike I'm on. (0+ / 0-)

        An e bike is not as nimble or maneuverable as a regular bike. It's not. Your obscuring the issue.

        •  it's the total weight: bike, rider, cargo. (0+ / 0-)

          This is basic Newtonian physics:

          Total mass = bike + rider + cargo.  Total mass determines the input of energy to increase or decrease speed or to change direction.

          A typical American bicycle weighs about 30 lbs.

          A battery pack weighs about 50 lbs.

          A person of any given weight will find an e-bike "less maneuverable" simply due to the increased mass of the battery pack.  

          But a lighter person on an e-bike is every bit as "maneuverable" as a heavier person on a regular bike.  

          A 150-lb. person on an 80-lb. e-bike has the same total weight as a 200-lb person on 30-lb. a regular bike.  Both of those cases weigh 230 lbs.  And 230 lbs. requires the same input of energy to increase or decrease speed or to change direction, regardless of how the 230 lbs. is distributed between the person and the vehicle.  

          We don't make policies, laws, or regulations, with different rules for people of different weights.  

          We don't tell the heavier person they can't carry an additional 50 lbs. of cargo on their bike, whether the cargo is groceries or batteries or both, just so they can stop in the same distance as a lighter person.  Instead we simply say that they have to be able to stop before they hit someone or something, and we leave that up to each rider and each bicycle (electric or not) as to how to achieve that result.  

          A heavier person has to allow for more stopping distance than a lighter person.  A person carrying a load, whether groceries and/or batteries and/or whatever, has to allow for more stopping distance than a person who isn't carrying a load.  

          And it's also the case that people adapt their riding to the machine and its load.  When someone starts using a bike for grocery shopping, they get used to the added weight.  Same case when someone starts using a bike that's heavier because it's got batteries onboard.  

          "Minus two votes for the Republican" equals "plus one vote for the Democrat." Arithmetic doesn't care about their feelings either!

          by G2geek on Wed Oct 03, 2012 at 08:07:37 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

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