Skip to main content

View Diary: Gerrymandering, Electoral College by Congressional district, and the 17th Amendment. (100 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  California managed to draw a nice map (0+ / 0-)

    and it's hardly a rural state. Their system is probably good for most urban states. For states that are highly competitive on the Presidential level (no redder than NC, no bluer than MN), I'm a fan of affirmative competition mandates to minimize the number of safe seats.

    Male, 22, -4.75/-6.92, born and raised TN-05, now WI-02. "You're damn right we're making a difference!" - Senator-Elect Tammy Baldwin (D-Madison)

    by fearlessfred14 on Fri Nov 16, 2012 at 09:03:08 AM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  True, (0+ / 0-)

      But do you think some of the competitiveness in California is also a result of the Top Two Primary system?

      •  I don't think that's most of it (0+ / 0-)

        Top Two has its own benefits IMHO, and might somewhat increase competition by encouraging moderate challengers like Bloomfield, Maldo, and Peters, but even with traditional primaries those districts would be competitive (maybe not Waxman's district, but certainly Bilbray's and Capps'). Under the old map, McNerney's district would be the only competitive district whatever the primary system. The others would just be too blue or too red.

        Male, 22, -4.75/-6.92, born and raised TN-05, now WI-02. "You're damn right we're making a difference!" - Senator-Elect Tammy Baldwin (D-Madison)

        by fearlessfred14 on Fri Nov 16, 2012 at 02:30:58 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  CA (0+ / 0-)

      CA, although not rural,  is actually a terrible example of an urban state. Most people would claim that LA and SF are CA's two urban centers - at least they are the only 2 places which have characteristics that are culturally like cities. However, SF is not even the biggest city in the bay area, population-wise, and there is much sprawl both inside and outside the triangle formed by the 3 bay area cities. Meanwhile LA is more a collection of suburban sprawl extending for miles, than a city. The rural areas of CA are also higher density than in typical rural states, due to a combination of bedroom communities and high-density immigrant labor housing.

      There aren't many states like CA (and the few are in VRA states). More common among urban states is an urban area  surrounded by a donut of outer-ring suburbs and exurbs, with the rest of the state being rural.  See Portland, Seattle, Denver, SLC, Minneapolis, Omaha,  Chicago, StLouis/KC, Pitt/Phil, NYC, Boston, etc.

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site