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View Diary: The War Against Poor People (30 comments)

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  •  Been fighting this one on FB (13+ / 0-)

    First of all, I agree with the diarist 100%.

    I have been fighting this particular one on Facebook and the pushback I'm getting is 3-fold.  

    1)  I have to submit to drug-testing for my job (or to get a job).  Why should it be considered a burden for "those people" but not for me.

    My current response is:  a private employer can put conditions on employment.  The government is bound by the laws regarding "probable cause."  There is no "probable cause" to test 100% of the drug recipients when you have a 98% negative return.

    2)  Every person in favor of drug testing seems to have seen somebody using an EBT card (the modern equiv. of food stamps) in the grocery store, flashing $100 bills to get smokes and liquor, then driving away in their BMWs, or some combination of this fairy tale.  

    My current response is 2 fold: a) I went from making over $50K a year to $0.00 income.  I'm on EBT.  My clothes and my car haven't changed, but my income sure has.  I shouldn't have to sell myself down to rags and a 20-year old junker before you think I'm worthy of using that card.

    And b)  if you've seen this, why didn't you report it?

    3)  It's not that expensive to test.  What is everybody whining about?

    My current response is:  each individual test cost isn't the point.  The point is that states that are crying about how cash-strapped they are still spending (or plan to spend) tens of thousands of dollars -- funneled into some private drug-testing company's pockets -- for a program with a success rate of about 2%.  How is this worth anybody's money to implement?  Aren't there better uses for a state's limited resources than lining some private company's pockets?

    Most of the response to this is along the lines of "Yeah, but..." and "I don't want MY money going to drug addicts..." and so on.  I'm hoping that in all of that, someone is reading what I'm writing and it's making an impression.

    Any suggestions on how to do it better?  I've brought in small government, fiscal conservativism, rights of individuals and even "you've been there -- I know you have.  You really want to have to pee in a cup just to get the benefits you know you have a right to?"

    "There isn't a way things should be. There's just what happens, and what we do." — Terry Pratchett (A Hat Full of Sky)

    by stormicats on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 08:34:03 AM PST

    •  Thanks! (4+ / 0-)

      I feel like I've been fighting this one out on Facebook as well.  I think what people don't understand is the underlying message.  What they're (people that want  poor and unemployed people tested) saying is people are more likely to be abusers of drugs.  Or even more accurately, that the reason that they are poor or unemployed is because of drugs.

      The whole poor people are shiftless and lazy meme drive me nuts.  And its not like they make public office holders or people with government contracts get tested.

    •  My usual response (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      socindemsclothing

      aside from the ones you've just mentioned:

      Gee, I hope you're not one of those people who think poor people are the worst people in the world.  Because I know people like that and they're all bigots.
      ...and depending on who I'm talking to here in Alabama I might throw in "...and that's just not very Christian/Biblical."

      “Nice country you got here. Shame if something were to happen to it” --the GOP philosophy to governing as described by Paul Krugman

      by dwayne on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 03:36:41 PM PST

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      •  Problem is, there are people I regard as friends (0+ / 0-)

        Folks that I have stood by in horrendous circumstances, people who have stood up for me when everyone else was looking the other way.  I don't want to stomp on their toes -- I just want to help them see things from a broader perspective and see themselves in what they are saying.

        And I am doing my best to keep religion out of it, regardless of where they (or I) might live.  One of my personal hot buttons is the insinuation that our public policy must be informed by a person's religious character.  Not their ethical character, but specifically their religious character.  I know that's not what you meant here, but we on the left really should stand firm on the separation of church and state, not only in what we do, but in the very way we phrase things.

        "There isn't a way things should be. There's just what happens, and what we do." — Terry Pratchett (A Hat Full of Sky)

        by stormicats on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 03:49:09 PM PST

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    •  I've been fighting this with my ex (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Fairlithe, socindemsclothing

      I don't know where I went wrong raising him, but I'm just glad we aren't married anymore - he's the worst of the Teabagger mentality - all gummint employees are overpaid grifters, all people on welfare and food stamps are drug addicts and need to be drug tested before getting any help, waitresses don't deserve tips no matter how well they've served him, all women do is get knocked up so they can steal a man's kids and money, and on and on. Even when truth is pointed out to him (he and his entire family from his grandparents to his kids are government employees, some of his kids were on food stamps while working full time jobs, some of his kids were waitstaff working for the tips he refused to leave, and none of his wives received alimony or child support nor did they deny him access to is children), he still repeats these Hannity and Limbaugh lies.

      Even his children are correcting him, and he still clings to the lies he heard on the radio over the truths of his own life. I don't see how he can believe the lies when they are so palpably not true in his own life.

      All knowledge is worth having. Check out OctopodiCon to support steampunk learning and fun. Also, on DKos, check out the Itzl Alert Network.

      by Noddy on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 04:06:20 PM PST

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      •  They are all exceptions don'cha know (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Noddy

        They are all the good waitstaff, the needed government workers, the deserving people on foodstamps. Of course his wives would never deny him access to his children or do anything as gauche as try to gouge him for alimony or child support.

        But those other people, oh, those other people.  He knows exactly what they are -- and he knows that his life would be immeasurably improved if only those people weren't trying to take things they didn't deserve.

        He doesn't see that out of the dozen cookies, the 1% have taken 11 and are trying to make those people -- of which he is one -- fight for the 12th.  Because from where they stand, there's not a bit of difference between him and those people.  

        "There isn't a way things should be. There's just what happens, and what we do." — Terry Pratchett (A Hat Full of Sky)

        by stormicats on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 05:12:35 PM PST

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        •  Big ol' eyeroll (0+ / 0-)

          at him.  He doesn't know a single person that fits the Beck, Hannity, and Limbaugh lies in real life. It's all hearsay, and he believes that hearsay over the evidence of his own experiences.

          That kind of willful blinkering just can't be easily or gently removed, it has to be blasted out with some sort of serious life-changing disaster, and I just am not the blasting type of person.

          All knowledge is worth having. Check out OctopodiCon to support steampunk learning and fun. Also, on DKos, check out the Itzl Alert Network.

          by Noddy on Mon Nov 19, 2012 at 08:14:31 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

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