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View Diary: Insect Folklore and Human History (58 comments)

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  •  Nice diary DS. I'm having a related problem right (4+ / 0-)

    now in that I found not a single wooly bear caterpillar this year and thus have no idea how much firewood I need to stockpile.

    Just give me some truth. John Lennon--- OWS------Too Big To Fail

    by burnt out on Wed Dec 05, 2012 at 06:42:00 AM PST

    •  Damm, my attempt at humor has once again fallen (4+ / 0-)

      flat. Guess ya never heard the folk lore surrounding wooly bear caterpillars and winter weather predictions. Or maybe I'm just not funny. ) :

      Just give me some truth. John Lennon--- OWS------Too Big To Fail

      by burnt out on Wed Dec 05, 2012 at 12:08:41 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I snickered2x..check the woodpile for spiders (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        burnt out, Polly Syllabic, JayDean

        and wooly bear remains.

        My BWidows and the False Black Widows, I call them Purple Widows, Steadota Grossa maybe?, eat them and often have several in the remains piles.

        And wear gloves in the woodpile, but, man, I am creeped out now, heh,, check the gloves before you put them on. Maybe step on them after you microwave and wash them.

        I have to go duct tape my pant legs now, 'scuse me.

        This machine kills Fascists.

        by KenBee on Wed Dec 05, 2012 at 01:08:44 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Hey thanks Ken, after several hours of silence (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Polly Syllabic, JayDean, KenBee

          those 2x snickers sound like a standing ovation to me right now, I was starting to think I had bad breath or something.
          After reading your comment though I have to tell you that 2x snickers dont' cover it, ROTFLOL comes pretty close. Dammmnn, you're good dude.

          My, yes, they're mine, fence lizards and wrens keep the spiders out of my wood piles, but I always wear gloves anyway, just in  case one sneaked past em.

          Just give me some truth. John Lennon--- OWS------Too Big To Fail

          by burnt out on Wed Dec 05, 2012 at 01:31:12 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  Yes, I have heard the story. (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        burnt out, Polly Syllabic, JayDean

        It is part of the folklore.  Unfortunately it is not reliable as a predictor of hard winters.

        •  I know............that's why it was (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Polly Syllabic
          my attempt at humor
          Sigh, never mind.

          Just give me some truth. John Lennon--- OWS------Too Big To Fail

          by burnt out on Wed Dec 05, 2012 at 01:54:44 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Ok, on a more serious side, maybe you can help me (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Polly Syllabic, JayDean

            take this one beyond Genus. I think it is an   Agelenopsis, but have been unable to go  further with it. Found in middle Missouri. Not a big deal, don't expect you to do a bunch of research for me, thought you just might happen to know.

             Photobucket

            Just give me some truth. John Lennon--- OWS------Too Big To Fail

            by burnt out on Wed Dec 05, 2012 at 02:06:57 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  This is a lycosid (note large posterior median ... (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Polly Syllabic, burnt out, JayDean

              eyes.)  My guess is that this is Rabidosa rabida (also known as Hogna rabida and Lycosa rabida).  It sure looks like it.  I always liked these pin-striped wolf spiders.

              Note: Agelenopsis has all eyes about the same size and has very long posterior spinnerets!

              •  Wow, it's a perfect match. Thank you. I suck at (3+ / 0-)

                IDs and it's not from lack of trying. It's just so confusing, so many different species that look so similar and then the variations found within the species themselves doesn't help either.

                Can I ask how you did that  so quickly? I  mean, is there any way for a complete novice to narrow things down quicker than looking through page after page of spiders looking for that one pic that matches what you're looking for. For instance , eye size, placement, etc, is there some place to first check eye configuration and then go from there? I mean without going through each and every family/genus one at a time to find out. Or anything of that sort to shorten the hunt? Or is it just a total of years of experience? ( I have many years of admiring them but only a few months at putting in the effort to find out what I was looking at).

                 I put them in as an ID request on Bug Guide from time to time and they are great at helping out but I always try to get it by myself first, in an attempt to educate myself, but I think there must be a better method than how I do it.

                 I have at least twenty more spiders I've been trying to ID and it is a slow, slow process. Just the other day I was looking for a tiny little gold and white one and with no clue where to begin so I started looking through  Entelegynes.  Bug guide has over 2,000 pages of  Entelegynes! I never did find the one I was looking for but found a couple others I had that I recognized while looking through the pics.

                One more , just because this is one of my favorite pics. Am I right on the ID of this one as be ing a Dolomedes triton Sixspotted Fishing Spider? Even though it has more than six spots........Also found in mid Mo.

                Photobucket

                Anyways, thanks again for the ID. Appreciate it!

                Just give me some truth. John Lennon--- OWS------Too Big To Fail

                by burnt out on Wed Dec 05, 2012 at 04:43:14 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  Yes, this appears to be Dolomedes triton. (3+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  burnt out, Polly Syllabic, JayDean

                  Eye arrangement is the first characteristic to check.  It will separate out three families of primitive spiders from the rest (Sicariidae, Diguetidae and Scytodidae - all have six eyes arranged in three diads), Salticidae (anterior eyes the largest), Lycosidae (four small eyes in front, two large eyes next, followed by two smaller eyes in back), Dysderidae and Segestriidae (six eyes in semicircle - Oonopidae also has a similar arrangement, but oonopids are tiny 1-2 mm mostly).  Other families with distinct eye arrangements are the Ctenidae, Oxyopidae, Dinopidae, and a few others.  Most have two rows of four each, although they may be equal or one pair or more may be slightly larger, or on tubercles. After eyes, go to legs - are the legs laterigrade?  i.e. first three pairs face forward and laterally- like a crab (various crab spider families) or do they have a row of very regular spines that consists of two sizes (Mimetidae).

                  I also have 50 years of experience, so it is not really fair.

                  •  Oh thank you! That's exactly the kind of (3+ / 0-)

                    information I was wanting . That will help!

                    And thanks for the confirmation on the triton too. I got one right!  This one was living in one of our yard ponds this summer but disappeared one day.  I think it's just beautiful.

                    Just give me some truth. John Lennon--- OWS------Too Big To Fail

                    by burnt out on Wed Dec 05, 2012 at 05:26:13 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

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