Skip to main content

View Diary: Bob Costas continues the dialog about guns and violence-support him by tuning into his show (182 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  doc2, given his size? (8+ / 0-)

    He could have killed her with a cellphone.  Lamp cord. Knife.  Fist. Come on.  Costas is right about a lot of the causes for this.
    Let's add steroids in athletics, and TBI - the topic the NFL struggles most with.  Players vs spouses isn't new news.  
    Tiger Woods seems to be the only one who got the receiving end of the five-iron.  

    How many MLB, NFL, NBA, and NHL wives have been hospitalized?  Too damn many.  Nichole Brown Simpson comes to mind as one of the few that remained in the news spotlight for a long time.  It took her death for that to happen.  OJ wasn't an anomaly.

    When it comes to firearms?
    Costas is correct on the fact that the murderer wouldn't have died so easily by his own hand, if no firearm was present.

    •  Possible. But the most lethal thing (4+ / 0-)

      we have available is the gun, and we all know that. It is a device invented to kill living things, and it does it quite well.

      •  Only about 6 percent more lethal than automobiles. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        kestrel9000
      •  Nichole Brown Simpson (0+ / 0-)

        wasn't a "possible" - nor was she killed with a handgun, with a knife and bloody glove planted to throw the blame on OJ - another professional football player.

        As to your assertion:  gun suicides are 100% likely to end in death?  
        I disagree from my experience, same for "catching the train".

        In both cases life-altering, and seldom does the suicidal person recover sufficiently to be fully participating in their own care and society as a whole.

        100% certainty of death comes with a second attempt, or after a shortened life of misery.

        •  Not 100%: (0+ / 0-)

          "That “impulsive behavior” the Harvard researchers referred to is what makes guns a death sentence for people intent on killing themselves. The study found that while firearms are used in only 5 percent of suicide attempts, they are responsible for more than 50 percent of suicide deaths because of their 90 percent fatality rate. Many of the most widely-used suicide attempt methods have fatality rates below five percent."

          Fatality rate of 90% when guns are the method of choice.
          And as you say, a life of misery for the "surviving" 10%.

          •  in the news feed today: (0+ / 0-)

            http://screen.yahoo.com/...

            Moral of the story - you have to make time for suicidal people.  They have to matter to someone, or they matter to no one.

            My experience is they feel abandoned and powerless. Choosing death is the ultimate expression of "you're not the boss of me".

            The difficult part has been knowing when to kick the door, grab the hand, and change the decision.  One girl kept a noted Manhattan Psychiatrist at-bay for 2 1/2 hours, while her blood filled the bathtub.
            "You have to respect her expressions of power over her life choices."
            He also expected a paramedic unit to have typed-and cross-matched blood, and venous cut-down capabilities.  We didn't.
            She died.
            We "should have known" and "sent the correct unit" to support his medical decision.
            There is no such unit.  An "unacceptable answer".

            I argued that at-times, kicking the door and saying "YOU MATTER and I'm not letting you go" is more important.
            Always an imprecise answer at-best.

            Doctors outrank paramedics, particularly Psychiatrists, or so I found out in post-incident disciplinary hearings.  Where a panel of physicians explained that I should have had "universal donor blood on-hand" as that was "a reasonable expectation from a medical professional, not in the trauma specialties".

            The attorney for the family of the deceased didn't buy that.

            •  Suicide is complicated. (0+ / 0-)

              In the case of the dead teenagers I knew, they were surrounded by people who loved them. In two cases, they were 16 year old boys upset because their girlfriends broke up with them. Their families knew that but never imagined that they felt as desperate as they did.  

              Another, my daughter's best friend, had never recovered from his guilt over a car accident that took a little girl's life- even though he was obeying the speed limit and she ran out between parked cars and everyone including the cops kept assuring him it was not his fault. In his case, people did know how devastated he was but felt powerless to help him heal.

              The other kids- no one really knew what tormented them and they did not leave a note. They're the scariest of all to me, and probably the reason I always see teenage boys as especially vulnerable. And sadly, they're more likely than girls to use a gun in a suicide attempt.

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site