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View Diary: US Health Care Unmasked: A true story (122 comments)

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  •  it does, if they doctor's billing person (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Chi

    files the proper ICD-9 and CPT codes for the time the doctor spent:

    1. in a visit with the patient, in person

    2. in a visit with the patient, or the patient's proxy or guardian, by telephone or facsimile

    3. determining which diagnosis applies

    4. determining which medication is appropriate

    5. Determining which category of visit was involved, short (5 mins); intermediate (15 mins) or complex (30 or more minutes)

    But make no mistake, doctors ARE paid for the time they spend writing prescriptions, if they submit the properly completed billing forms for the services rendered.

    Hospital billing staff would most definitely bill for this time.

    They are some of the nation's best Medical Coders, and they attend regular training to ensure they have the best and newest information on how to code the newest medical procedures properly for re-payment by insurance sources like Medicare and Medicaid and the plethora of private insurers.


    "I like paying taxes...with them, I buy Civilization" -- me

    by Angie in WA State on Mon Dec 10, 2012 at 12:27:10 PM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  No (0+ / 0-)

      you don't get a pop from one E&M code to another for adding a prescription or for writing a more expensive prescription.

      Done with politics for the night? Have a nice glass of wine with Palate Press: The online wine magazine.

      by dhonig on Mon Dec 10, 2012 at 02:13:54 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  You are wrong & right in the same sentence (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Chi

        Because they do not get paid specifically to "write a prescription".

        That is absolutely true.

        What they get paid for, is the time spent using their knowledge base and the patient's symptoms, current medications and any testing results, and coming to a diagnosis - or in the event nothing has changed, and the patient is asking for a refill, the time spent to ensure nothing in patient chart is new or cause to not order the refill, or to inform the patient they must return for a visit (and likely some basic blood & urine testing prior to the visit) before a refill can be authorized.

        All of this time spent IS billable. This time is the basis for the why the doctor then writes an Rx or a refill for one.


        "I like paying taxes...with them, I buy Civilization" -- me

        by Angie in WA State on Mon Dec 10, 2012 at 04:28:29 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Nope (0+ / 0-)

          time is used as a summary shorthand to explain E&M coding, but when it comes to actual coding, it does not make a difference. The other time you describe goes into the formulation, but the writing of a single Rx during a visit won't make a difference. It won't raise an office visit from a level 4 to a level 4.

          Done with politics for the night? Have a nice glass of wine with Palate Press: The online wine magazine.

          by dhonig on Tue Dec 11, 2012 at 06:01:22 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

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