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View Diary: Why? CNN and NPR Present a Potpourri of Tragic Mulattoes Before a National Audience (285 comments)

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  •  To answer your questions, in part (3+ / 0-)

    ...my children are a bit too young for explicit conversations on sociology and racial anthropology.

    I'm currently providing my young children with a base of healthy learning and love to make sure they feel valued as people. As capable self-confident people, when they have to deal with some judgmental jackasses in the future they get to understand that it's the other guy that has the issue, not them.

    I fully understand that there will be plenty of external forces (e.g., the cab drivers that won't pick them up at night) that contribute to defining their experiences. But, I will build them strong enough that that kind of stuff won't poison their character and won't drive their own definitions of who they are as people.

    With regard to"are you one of those parents who are teaching their "mixed race" children all sorts of fictions?", bite me. (Tried to keep the bitterness out, but I think you earned that one.)

    "I'm very important. I have many leather-bound books and my apartment smells of rich mahogany." - Ron Burgundy

    by malharden on Mon Dec 10, 2012 at 02:45:02 PM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  good luck with this one (6+ / 0-)

      "in the future they get to understand that it's the other guy that has the issue, not them. I fully understand that there will be plenty of external forces (e.g., the cab drivers that won't pick them up at night) that contribute to defining their experiences. But, I will build them strong enough that that kind of stuff won't poison their character and won't drive their own definitions of who they are as people."

      the reality is that your kids will have lots of problems and unique challenges because of their race and how they are perceived.  just a fact.

      your kids are likely very smart. young children are very knowledgeable about race and racial difference. they absorb so much on these matters and have a very refined sense of race "mattering" in this society. look at the nbc special on color bias, implicit values, and color bias among kids. never mind sister elliot's brown eyes blue eyes test. or the classic black doll white doll test.

      an anecdote. a student came to me when i was an admin a few years back. she was a "mixed race" racially confused kid whose white mom--the  black dad was not present--had raised her that she was biracial/mixed and not really black.

      someone had called her a nigger. she kept arguing that she wasn't black. the person calling her such a slur made it clear that to most people in this program--and society--she was seen as a black woman.

      this young woman, in her early 20s damn near had a nervous breakdown when she realized that yes, she was black and had best get used to it. her mom lied to her and did not give her life and coping skills because of some dishonest post-racial mess of a dream that hurt her child.

      her eyes were opened and now she is a much happier and well-adjusted person for it.

    •  Sounds good to me. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      shaharazade, gramofsam1

      Hopefully when they are older when things start to matter to them, perhaps the world [or this country] will be different enough that it won't matter either way.

      But judging from how the first African American President is treated in some circles of this country in 2012, I don't hold out a whole lot of hope for the immediate future.  

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