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View Diary: Today everything changed at school. (183 comments)

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  •  Uhm. What about fire codes? (0+ / 0-)

    Don't fire codes require that any location within the building have two possible escape routes to the outside that take a path that is less than X number of feet in length to get out?  (X varies by specific code).

    Windows that are easily opened from the inside are acceptable escape routes for this, usually.  So might there be a case where the reason the building was up to code before was because you could argue that you can get out through other classrooms' windows if you can't get to an outside door from the hallway?  Locking the classrooms so you can get out of your room, but can't get into any other rooms might invalidate this route.  Sure, a new building can be built with this in mind, but if locked classrooms was never part of the original plan for the existing building, it might not be up to code once you lock the doors.  They might need to knock out a wall somewhere and add an additional second door to create a second route shorter than X feet.

    •  That would be highly unusual. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      PsychoSavannah

      Most evacuation plans would not require winding your way through another classroom full of unfamiliar desks and other obstacles as an escape route. It may be a longer route but a clear, familiar path through a hallway to the nearest exit would likely be the safest and preferred means of evacuation.

      I attended a school that had a central hallway with classrooms on either side. The rooms on one side of the hallway had direct access to the playground; there was an exterior exit door in each room. Kids in those rooms could head directly outside for recess or during fire drills. The kids in the classrooms on the other side of the hallway without direct access to the outside were always required to use the main exits to access the playground or during fire drills. At no time was anyone allowed to cut through another classroom; even if it was a shorter distance.

      As for the security measures in the diary; most of them were in place in the small consolidated school district I attended in the midwest in the late 70s and early 80s. Parents were always welcome at the school but at no time were they allowed to simply show up unannounced at their child's classroom. If Johnny forgot his lunch mom could bring it to school and leave it for him at the front office. Doors locked from the inside and there was a safety bar so you could exit easily in case of emergency. All the doors opened out of the classrooms, not in. Teachers were expected to keep their classroom doors shut during class although this wasn't always strictly enforced. The only thing we didn't have were lockdowns. I'm sure that has become part of standard procedure now too.


      Not this mind and not this heart, I won't rot • Mumford & Sons

      by jayden on Tue Dec 18, 2012 at 12:35:20 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Wouldn't this be the problem I was talking about? (0+ / 0-)
        The rooms on one side of the hallway had direct access to the playground; there was an exterior exit door in each room.
        Okay so it's not a window but a door, but it's still the same problem, isn't it?  That door is an exit that if you can't get into the classroom from the hallway because it's locked, is not an available exit.
        •  No. (0+ / 0-)

          Please reread what I wrote:

          The kids in the classrooms on the other side of the hallway without direct access to the outside were always required to use the main exits to access the playground or during fire drills. At no time was anyone allowed to cut through another classroom; even if it was a shorter distance.


          Not this mind and not this heart, I won't rot • Mumford & Sons

          by jayden on Tue Dec 18, 2012 at 06:29:38 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  You are making the mistake (0+ / 0-)

            of assuming I was talking about fire drills.  I wasn't.  Now please re-read what I wrote.  I was talking about fire codes which are NOT the same thing as drills.  In a drill you don't make people test all alternate routes spec'ed out for the fire codes.  You only make them test one route.

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