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View Diary: White privilege and Sandy Hook (490 comments)

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  •  seems to me that it's only (15+ / 0-)

    white Americans who are entitled to that "idealized safe place".

    I would contend that NONE of the African Americans who live in economically disadvantaged communities (i.e., the "ghetto" or "the hood") have ANY safe place. None. They are not safe in school, nor on the street, nor at the mall, nor on their front porch. Nowhere. And it matters not how young or old they are. Matters not whether they "know" the shooters or don't. (Don't know many 2- and 3-year olds who actually "know" any gangbangers!)

    So that's another element of white privilege that enters into the picture here: privileged white (and especially privileged white WEALTHY) Americans are entitled to safety.

    The rest of us are not?

    •  According to NRA-thinking (0+ / 0-)

      the 'hood ought to be the safest place in the world. You know, because guns.

      The idea of a safe place seems to come with a sense of community. I've lived in poor areas where I felt much safer than the "nice" neighborhoods, for the simple reason that I knew my neighbors and happened to share half a block of street with people who had kindness in them.

      I grant that I am a white woman, and that state of existence affords me the privileges of membership in the White Privilege club. Sandy Hook was shocking on many levels, but I think it was less the location variables (middle class, northeast US, small town) than it was the fact that it was little kids. Columbine should have taught us that white, middle class suburbs were no safe place.

      Now, of course, the news coverage angles and such are a different story. I stuck to NPR and print/online rather than TV, but the few news clips I saw made me think there was an element of "how could this happen to nice white folks" mixed in.

      How does the Republican Congress sit down with all the butthurt over taxing the wealthy?

      by athenap on Thu Dec 27, 2012 at 12:30:12 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Not to jump on you, but no, most people in (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ancblu, mamamedusa

        "The Hood" don't have guns, and it's the racist narratives of the news and our society at large that lead you to believe that they do.  Part of the reason more black people don't get concealed carry permits is because they know that it would greatly increase their chance of being killed by the police.  If black males get killed for reaching for their wallet or ID then why in the world would they be safer with an actual gun.

        The revolution will not be televised. But it will be blogged, a lot. Probably more so than is necessary.

        by AoT on Thu Dec 27, 2012 at 12:52:45 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  However well meaning, (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          AoT

          it seems extraordinarily difficult for many to recognize the realities of privilege, class and race and the continuing inequalities that perpetuate them -- not least in our "justice" system.

          As with the revealing and misplaced emphasis on "assault weapons" rather than handguns as a chimerical "safe haven,"  it is another central and indisputable fact that large urban centers have the lowest per capita gun ownership rates and the highest incidence of firearm related homicides and other violent crime.

          The most obvious issues of under-privilege in most public discourse on this national crisis are studiously neglected and ignored -- almost universally on the right and by a substantial majority on the left.

          The one permanent emotion of the inferior man is fear - fear of the unknown, the complex, the inexplicable. What he wants above everything else is safety. H.L. Mencken

          by ancblu on Thu Dec 27, 2012 at 01:46:21 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I would correct you only in that (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            ancblu

            I imagine that it's the lowest private gun ownership rates, the police have more than average.

            The revolution will not be televised. But it will be blogged, a lot. Probably more so than is necessary.

            by AoT on Thu Dec 27, 2012 at 01:57:06 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  "Per Capita" (0+ / 0-)

              is simply on average per person - in an individual capacity.

              It is certainly correct that various sub-population groups, whether urban, suburban or rural, would have different relative ownership rates ... police vs. civilian, older vs. younger, or wealthier vs. poorer, or more educated vs. less ... and so on.

              The one permanent emotion of the inferior man is fear - fear of the unknown, the complex, the inexplicable. What he wants above everything else is safety. H.L. Mencken

              by ancblu on Thu Dec 27, 2012 at 03:07:44 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

        •  I know this is late but I've been out sick... (0+ / 0-)

          And I don't think any but the most troubled parts of the most troubled neighborhoods of any city would have a higher concentration of guns per capita (in fact, I'm inclined to think that rural areas have a higher concentration of guns to bodies because of the low population density, but I digress...).

          But like I said, it's NRA-thinking. Populations with approaching 1:1 gun to human ratio should be the safest, free-est, happiest, liberty-est places in the world, because guns=freedom.

          And yes, I'm being sarcastic there. I'm encountering a lot of people for whom freedom boils down to the 2nd amendment and all others count for nothing. If that's truly the case, then there's only going to be one free person in the whole world, and that'd be the dude with the most guns. I throw up my hands at such logics.

          How does the Republican Congress sit down with all the butthurt over taxing the wealthy?

          by athenap on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 03:23:54 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  This is a big part of it (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        peggy, mamamedusa
        The idea of a safe place seems to come with a sense of community. I've lived in poor areas where I felt much safer than the "nice" neighborhoods, for the simple reason that I knew my neighbors and happened to share half a block of street with people who had kindness in them.
        This is also why I prefer the term 'Hood over ghetto. To me, the hood is about who my neighbors are.

        Most activists and scholars I know or have read, along with just about everyone who remembers the "good old days", agree that the collapse of the sense of community is one result of the various wars waged against Black and especially poor Black people--the war on drugs, war on poverty (which drugs and poverty obviously won), urban "renewal", redlining, mandatory sentencing laws, the rise of the prison industrial complex, the broadening of the primary school to prison pipeline, etc.

        And of course, this collapse of community is a huge factor influencing what's going on in urban black-and-brown areas.
        We need to understand that the black community didn't just collapse on its own--policies, attitudes, on the part of the government and its people--put so much pressure on it and in so many different forms, I challenge any community anywhere in the world to come out intact.

        Takes a village? Yeah, well, wasn't there also something about destroying the village to save the man? (wink wink) Oh wait. Mixing massacres here. But still. My point is that once the village has been destroyed, it's probably going to take a nation to raise the child.

        •  This was the only reason (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          mamamedusa

          I voted for legalizing marijuana.  I don't smoke anything and don't want to be around it.  I don't particularly understand why people want to do it.  That said, getting rid of laws that are only used to target certain people is desirable.

           

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