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  •  Carl Sagan also wrote a book in which he (0+ / 0-)

    claimed that ancient aliens had brought civilization to the earth.  You don't really know what you're talking about.

    The book was Intelligent Life in the Universe by Schklovsky and Sagan (1969).

    No doubt you'll deny it.

    •  Right, sure (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      emelyn, AoT, Fonsia, Smoh

      http://en.wikipedia.org/...

      In their 1966 book Intelligent Life in the Universe[19] astrophysicists I.S. Shklovski and Carl Sagan devote a chapter[20] to arguments that scientists and historians should seriously consider the possibility that extraterrestrial contact occurred during recorded history. However, Shklovski and Sagan stressed that these ideas were speculative and unproven.

      Shklovski and Sagan argued that sub-lightspeed interstellar travel by extraterrestrial life was a certainty when considering technologies that were established or feasible in the late '60s;[21] that repeated instances of extraterrestrial visitation to Earth were plausible;[22] and that pre-scientific narratives can offer a potentially reliable means of describing contact with outsiders.[23] Additionally, Shklovski and Sagan cited tales of Oannes, a fishlike being attributed with teaching agriculture, mathematics, and the arts to early Sumerians, as deserving closer scrutiny as a possible instance of paleocontact due to its consistency and detail.[24]

      In his 1979 book Broca's Brain, Sagan[25] suggested that he and Shklovski might have inspired the wave of '70s ancient astronaut books, expressing disapproval of "von Däniken and other uncritical writers" who seemingly built on these ideas not as guarded speculations but as "valid evidence of extraterrestrial contact." Sagan argued that while many legends, artifacts, and purported out-of-place artifacts were cited in support of ancient astronaut theories, "very few require more than passing mention" and could be easily explained with more conventional theories. Sagan also reiterated his earlier conclusion that extraterrestrial visits to Earth were possible but unproven, and perhaps improbable.

      There is nothing so ridiculous that some philosopher has not said it. -- Cicero

      by tytalus on Fri Dec 28, 2012 at 08:08:24 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Francis Crick came to propose (0+ / 0-)

        panspermia as the basis for life on Earth.

        •  And it's an interesting proposal (4+ / 0-)

          But so far it's only a proposal and hasn't been tested at all.  At least that I know of.

          The revolution will not be televised. But it will be blogged, a lot. Probably more so than is necessary.

          by AoT on Fri Dec 28, 2012 at 09:25:33 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  In this case, again (0+ / 0-)

            A little sourcing of facts reveals the commenter (like the diarist) has mischaracterized things, somewhat. The claim wasn't downright false this time. It just leaves out Crick re-evaluating his pet theory later in life, based on new data.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/...

            There is nothing so ridiculous that some philosopher has not said it. -- Cicero

            by tytalus on Fri Dec 28, 2012 at 02:06:15 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  I still think that some sort of spermia is likely (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              corvo

              and I imagine that we'll find some Earth biology in small amounts in spots around the solar system.  We know there is biological ejecta that can reach space, so it's really just a matter of time.

              The revolution will not be televised. But it will be blogged, a lot. Probably more so than is necessary.

              by AoT on Fri Dec 28, 2012 at 02:14:37 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

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