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View Diary: Something on the Autism Spectrum... (48 comments)

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  •  The wrong quote (5+ / 0-)

    or if you get a word wrong, is always an issue. Our whole family has become experts in using quotes LOL. And if you make a mistake he'll definitely tell you about it!

    I'm glad you're not dealing with the violence, that was particularly difficult to handle. He's also very protective of his little sister, and he was never violent with her, but we were definitely battered parents.

    I used to tell my son there is no 'normal'. He's normal for him, I'm normal for me, but there is no 'normal' everyone is different, and everyone has their own unique issues, even if you can't see them.

    I think the hardest part we're having right now, is that his younger sister (he's 17, she's will be 10 next month) dotes on him. And when he's having a bad day and wants to be left alone and she just wants to spend time with him, feelings inevitably get hurt. You would think by now she'd know to leave him alone at those times, but she just keeps pushing at him until he snaps at her or we do. Other days, his good days, they'll play wii games together, or DS games, or board games, etc for hours on end. He has more good days than bad days, but those bad days can be hard.

    "Madness! Total and complete madness! This never would've happened if the humans hadn't started fighting one another!" Londo Mollari

    by FloridaSNMOM on Fri Jan 04, 2013 at 10:31:46 AM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  Agreed! (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      FloridaSNMOM, Avila, Cassandra Waites

      Reminds me of something the psychiatrist said; "There will be many more hurdles after this". My wife and I just smiled and said, "they're not hurdles. It's Andrew. How can that be a hurdle?"

      Sure, people will be difficult, and we'll have to jump through hoops for treatment and school, but that's peripheral crap. Andrew, our son, the child, is not, never has been, and never will be a "hurdle".

      I'd rather let a thousand guilty men go free than chase after them.

      by Freelance Escapologist on Fri Jan 04, 2013 at 10:42:58 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Hurdles aren't our kids... (3+ / 0-)

        they're things other people put in our way. Unrealistic expectations, snide comments, denial of services and treatments, IEP meetings where they don't want to actually do anything... those are the hurdles. The first hurdle was getting the diagnosis. At least now in many states they are passing laws requiring insurance to cover treatment for our kids.
        By the way, for the fine motor and motor planning, look into Occupational Therapy services both in school and out of it. In school services are more limited in what they can provide, but sometimes they are the only ones accessible due to financial means. If you can get OT outside of school as well.

        "Madness! Total and complete madness! This never would've happened if the humans hadn't started fighting one another!" Londo Mollari

        by FloridaSNMOM on Fri Jan 04, 2013 at 10:49:05 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  He's getting about 120 minutes of OT a week.. (3+ / 0-)

          ..in school. At home we work in arts and crafts every moment we can, ask him to help us out around the house with little jobs that not only help his co-ordination, but also teach him useful skills and give him a sense of accomplishment. One of our esteemed Eastern European friends (and Harvard MD) suggested that, which is why school was amazed his fine motor skills were as progressed as they were.

          I'd rather let a thousand guilty men go free than chase after them.

          by Freelance Escapologist on Fri Jan 04, 2013 at 10:51:50 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Great! (3+ / 0-)

            You wouldn't believe the amount of people who were never told that OT would help. I wasn't until my son was old enough that medicaid wouldn't pay for it any longer. But then I went to school for OTA, and I just added things in myself. He had a very sensory Christmas one year, with moon shoes, and a therapy ball, and several other sensory oriented gifts to help him. Games and toys and such. We do a lot of 'life skills' stuff too. Our kids tend not to learn through osmosis like a lot of kids do, you have to teach them how to wash dishes and do laundry, and clean floors, they don't just learn by watching generally.

            "Madness! Total and complete madness! This never would've happened if the humans hadn't started fighting one another!" Londo Mollari

            by FloridaSNMOM on Fri Jan 04, 2013 at 10:59:26 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

      •  There are many more hurdles (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Freelance Escapologist, chimene

        in the raising of any child. I don't know any parent raising a child that has smooth sailing all the way.

        I have a good friend with a neurotypical son the same age as my daughter, and he tried to commit suicide after his high school girl friend dumped him. Both this son and her other one have also dabbled with illegal drugs.

        Personally, I'd rather deal with the autism hurdles!

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