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View Diary: The Fantasy of "Government Tyranny" (211 comments)

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  •  There's an historical precedent (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skwimmer, bontemps2012

    for an act of gross tyranny by the federal government: the emancipation of the slaves, first by wartime presidential orders, and later and finally by the 13th Amendment.

    The liberty of slaveowners to possess slaves was part of the American Revolution, the Articles of Confederation, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights. Compromises made in order to protect that natural right, that God-given liberty, is why we have state sovereignty, why there was a 3/5 compromise, why we have the Senate and the Electoral College.

    Emancipation of slaves was going on all over the world in the final quarter of the 18th and first half of the 19th Centuries. It was the very real fear of precisely this tyrannical act by the federal government that caused the 2nd Amendment to be enacted in order to protect the right of states to maintain armed militias sufficient to repel an emancipatory invasion by the permanent federal military.

    In the end, the worst fears of the slaveowners were realized. The long-feared invasion took place. The militias fought valiantly and then desperately, but in the end, they could not prevail. A great deal of valuable property was confiscated from thousands of our citizens, and one of the liberties and rights upon which the nation was founded was lost forever.

    It was a gross act of tyranny, probably the most extreme one that our nation has ever known, but I don't think we need fear anything like it today.

    •  Actually, the North was after the Pocahontas Coal (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      skwimmer, bontemps2012

      Deposits of West Virginia -- the Saudi Arabia of their day.   Greatest deposit of high quality coal on the planet.  VITAL to Big Steel, Big Railroad, the US Navy,  the British Navy and the Industrial Revolution in the United States.

      The famous British geologist David T Ansted had been hired to scout the deposit in 1853.  During the Civil War, the state of West Virginia was illegally created by splitting off part of Virginia -- an act explicitly banned by the Constitution.   After the war, New York financier Abram Hewitt made a massive fortune in the West Virginia coalfields.   Abram was the son-in-law of the leading financier of the Abolitionist movement --  the immensely wealthy Peter Cooper.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/...

      Of course, many other New York and Philadelphia and even British investors fed on that carcass for decades.

      •  "Give us our slaves back !!" (0+ / 0-)

        I do believe that's the next logical step in that progression.

        Undoing the 13th Amendment will be demanded as compensation for passing a long term extension to the debt ceiling.

        "We have done nothing to be ashamed of. We have nothing to apologize for." NRA 12/14/2012

        by bontemps2012 on Thu Jan 10, 2013 at 11:01:49 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  I would discuss the immense corruption of the (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      skwimmer

      Pennsylvania Railroad and their  Republican prostitutes in Congress --but my stomach is not strong enough.

      Simply note that the Northern Coal barons reinstituted slavery in Appalachia after the Civil War for both black and white coal miners -- the feudal system known as the company town.   A system overthrown only after the miners formed the UAW union and fought a vicious guerrilla war --blowing up mines and shooting the Pinkerton security guards bought in from outside.

      That slavery had the same lingering malign effects on Appalachian whites as Southern slavery had on American blacks -- as can be seen by visiting the area today.

    •  not to mention ... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bontemps2012

      their precious 2nd amendment rights ended up being worth squat, even when entire states took up arms against the federal government.

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