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View Diary: Marriage equality, climate change, and a moral vision for America in Obama's second inauguration (165 comments)

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  •  I'm not American. Please explain nt (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Denise Oliver Velez

    I know you believe you understood what you think I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant. -- S.I. Hayakawa

    by tapu dali on Mon Jan 21, 2013 at 10:55:04 AM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  Explain (6+ / 0-)

      The three places mentioned were sites where the civil rights of women, racial minorities, and gay and lesbian Americans were declared. Recognition by the President in an inaugural speech is historic.

      The best of America!

      Welcome to this board, tapu Dali.

      "What everyone wants is a job and some hope."--RFK

      by For Dean in Dixie on Mon Jan 21, 2013 at 11:02:09 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Many thanks! nt (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        kalmoth, Denise Oliver Velez

        I know you believe you understood what you think I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant. -- S.I. Hayakawa

        by tapu dali on Mon Jan 21, 2013 at 11:26:52 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Seneca Falls (0+ / 0-)

          http://en.wikipedia.org/...

          The Seneca Falls Convention was an early and influential women's rights convention, the first to be organized by women in the Western world, in Seneca Falls, New York, July 19–20, 1848. It was planned by local New York women upon the occasion of a visit by Philadelphia-based Lucretia Mott, a Quaker famous for her orating ability, a skill rarely cultivated by American women at the time. The local women, primarily members of a radical Quaker group, organized the meeting along with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, a skeptical non-Quaker who followed logic more than religion.

          The meeting spanned two days and six sessions, and included a lecture on law, a humorous presentation, and multiple discussions about the role of women in society. Stanton and the Quaker women presented two prepared documents, the Declaration of Sentiments and an accompanying list of resolutions, to be debated and modified before being put forward for signatures. A heated debate sprang up regarding women's right to vote, with many including Mott urging the removal of this concept, but Frederick Douglass argued eloquently for its inclusion, and the suffrage resolution was retained. Exactly 100 of approximately 300 attendees signed the document, mostly women.

          Selma - civil rights

          http://en.wikipedia.org/...

          Stonewall
          http://en.wikipedia.org/...

          Join us on the Black Kos front porch to review news and views written from a black pov—everyone is welcome.

          by Denise Oliver Velez on Mon Jan 21, 2013 at 12:25:39 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  Famous locations regarding civil rights struggles (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      tapu dali, Denise Oliver Velez

      ..for women, gays, and blacks

      The Aggressively Ignorant Caucus is getting aggressively ignorant again.

      by Anthony Page aka SecondComing on Mon Jan 21, 2013 at 11:04:35 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

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