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View Diary: Even JPL Presenters Treat Boys and Girls Differently (267 comments)

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  •  It's almost impossible to avoid sometimes (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    qofdisks, white blitz

    I have to grade my papers without looking at the names.

    http://callatimeout.blogspot.com/

    by DAISHI on Thu Jan 24, 2013 at 03:08:28 PM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  I had a Physics Teacher (6+ / 0-)

      who had a pretty good solution.

      Say we had a test with 10 physics problems. Instead of going through all 10 of a person's answers, she would instead grade by problems.  First she'd grade problem #1 for every student. Then problem #2 for every student, etc.

      This allowed her to be more consistent by being able to quickly know how she was grading a problem, across the entire segment of students.  Secondly, as each problem typically took up a page, or at least a half of page, in all but the first couple of problems, she'd never see a name at the top of the page.

      Self-described political "centrists" believe the best policy is halfway between right and wrong. — @RBReich via web

      by BentLiberal on Thu Jan 24, 2013 at 05:59:09 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Good method. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        BentLiberal
      •  I always graded my tests this way (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        BentLiberal, nomandates, celdd

        First I marked every thing that was wrong. After I saw what kinds of mistakes were made, I could make a rubric- two points for this mistake 3 points for incorrect units, etc. The more times you see a given mistake, the more it annoys you and the more points you "feel" like taking off. The poor students at the bottom of the pile would be really screwed if I just graded straight through.

        Some times I would have all the tests corrected, but told my students I wasn't going to assign grades to them until I was in a better mood. They always approved.

        I do think this potential for grading bias is one reason scanned multiple choice tests are so popular.

    •  Same problem in music auditions (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      nomandates, irishwitch

      They proved there was discrimination by having blind auditions.  They were called by number and played behind a screen.  What do you know, more women started getting hired!

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