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View Diary: Landlord trying to evict family, refuses to provide heat (119 comments)

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  •  I called the News Station. (17+ / 0-)

    The reporter on the story wasn't there. It's 10:30 pm. But I told the lady who answered the phone that I'm calling so people will know that one more person cares about the Smith Family.

    I told the woman who answered the phone that in NJ the Smith's landlord, would be in jail!

    Brought To You By That Crazed Sociologist/Media Fanatic rebel ga Be The Change You Want To See In The World! Gandhi

    by rebel ga on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 07:38:42 PM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  I love it. We should storm the station (5+ / 0-)

      with phone calls tomorrow.

    •  Exactly. In many places, that's against local (0+ / 0-)

      laws or codes. Most places I've lived have a renters assistance hotline through city government. Might not help that this is Friday night.

      Why doesn't someone just pay the damn power bill for her? I paid a friend's utilities bills when he couldn't afford heat for his family in the Illinois winter. Wasn't difficult at all.

      We cannot mistake absolutism for principle, or substitute spectacle for politics, or treat name-calling as reasoned debate. -Pres. Obama, 1/21/13

      by SoCalSal on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 08:19:28 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  In NJ the landlord would be in jail, but in NC... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Black Max, JayRaye

      you see, NC is a Right To Lease state.

      •  In NC, apparently, tenants are dogs. (0+ / 0-)

        But even dogs are not expected to pay to stay in a heatless house. And the humane society would intervened if it were to cold for the dog.

        So I guess tenants are less than dogs in NC?

        WE NEVER FORGET Our Labor Martyrs: a project to honor the men, women and children who lost their lives in Freedom's Cause. For Jan: USW Local Mourns Fallen Brother

        by JayRaye on Sat Jan 26, 2013 at 08:57:40 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Yes, and that is why... (0+ / 0-)

        ...rent in NJ is 37% higher than rent in NC.

        I am a landlord, an I know the feel-good appeal of pro-tenant laws. They usually backfire and result in higher rent.

        No landlord evicts a paying tenant for no reason. I bet there is more to this story than we are being told.

        I will reserve my outrage until all the facts are in...!

        •  Isn't cost of living, salaries, etc also 37% (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Sharon Wraight, Stills

          higher, and couldn't it be explained by education level, amenities available, etc?

          I'm a landlord too, and I know there are plenty of idiot landlords.  Don't be so quick to assume it's the tenant's fault.  So you think laws requiring landlords to make a home habitable (heat, hot water, etc) are only for feel-good appeal?

          Sweeping generalizations are always wrong.  :D

          •  Think about it. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Sparhawk

            "Cost of living" doesn't affect rent. In fact rent is the biggest component of cost-of-living.

            Higher salaries don't cause higher rent. If you get a raise, do you send your landlord an extra $50/month?

            Amenities? Maybe. But do you have data showing that apartments in NJ are nicer than ones in NC?

            The only (other than regulations) that might make a difference are the costs of labor for roofers, plumbers, etc. These are higher in NJ, but not 37% higher. And even if they were, they are not the only component of expense.

            "So you think laws requiring landlords to make a home habitable (heat, hot water, etc) are only for feel-good appeal?"
            Warranty of habitability laws result in safer homes and better conditions for people who rent. They also result in higher rent. Unless somebody takes up that slack (like Section 8), people will be made homeless.

            Why do you think you see so many homeless in NYC and so few in NC? NC apartments may not be as nice, but they are cheaper and people can afford to get off the street. In NYC, people live out of shopping carts, within sight of the nicest, safest housing in the world.

            •  Because people in NC go to New York (0+ / 0-)

              At least in NY, nobody will shoot them.  And there are homeless people in NC, they live where you don't see them.  One of the aspects of living in the city is you see more people, of all types.  So you see more homeless people as well.

              Now, by amenities I didn't mean the rentals had more amenities.  I meant New Jersey has more things to offer than North Carolina and people are willing to pay more for that.  It's close to NY and Philadelphia.  People pay enough taxes that roads, sidewalks, bridges etc actually get fixed.  One aspect of "Right to Work" laws (which I was deriding with my "Right to Lease" comment) is it leads to lower wages.  Independent of the higher salaries, people in New Jersey have more disposable income than people in North Carolina.  That means they can buy more of what they want, rather than less, because there's more likely to be something left after paying for rent, groceries, and utilities.

              Are you seriously proposing that habitability laws are wrong?  Because if you are, I question what you are doing here.

              •  I don't think he's saying they are wrong (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                ManhattanMan

                Just that they increase prices and the higher prices are something you have to be willing to pay if you pass such laws. There is no free lunch anywhere.

                (-5.50,-6.67): Left Libertarian
                Leadership doesn't mean taking a straw poll and then just throwing up your hands. -Jyrinx

                by Sparhawk on Sun Jan 27, 2013 at 05:33:03 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  I cannot believe we are even having this (0+ / 0-)

                  discussion.

                  Lots of things add to prices.  So the fvck what?  You cannot reduce everything in life to just dollars and cents.  People who do so are, frankly, sociopathic.

                  •  Sure you can (2+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    ManhattanMan, nextstep

                    Understanding that these laws raise prices is a key component of understanding if you want the laws or don't want them. On balance, I agree that habitability laws are a good idea. Then again, I have a decent apartment that I can easily afford. If I was on poor and on the margin, I don't know if I would want the minimum prices that come with establishing such requirements.

                    This has nothing to do with morality or what people want. It's just simple math. Putting regulations on things increases the price. It's as close to a law of the universe as you'll find in a social science like economics.

                    (-5.50,-6.67): Left Libertarian
                    Leadership doesn't mean taking a straw poll and then just throwing up your hands. -Jyrinx

                    by Sparhawk on Sun Jan 27, 2013 at 05:49:08 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                •  Exactly. (0+ / 0-)

                  If you increase regulation in NC to (for example) NY levels housing costs are gonna go up.

                  NC has a 0.14% homeless rate. NY has double that.

                  If you put regulations on landlords, you need to be ready to hand out rent subsidies to the poor -- or else you will have more homeless people.

                  Here in NYC, buildings sit vacant because regulations make the cost of renting them out too high. It is cheaper for landlords to do nothing rather than try to rent them out.

              •  hmm... (0+ / 0-)

                I wonder if more people move from NC to NY or NJ or vice versa?

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