Skip to main content

View Diary: Research Study Explains How U.S. Media Brainwashes The Public (288 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  Sadly that is not the case. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cotterperson, Sychotic1, dov12348
    Confirmation bias (also called confirmatory bias or myside bias) is a tendency of people to favor information that confirms their beliefs or hypotheses.[Note 1][1] People display this bias when they gather or remember information selectively, or when they interpret it in a biased way. The effect is stronger for emotionally charged issues and for deeply entrenched beliefs. For example, in reading about current political issues, people usually prefer sources that affirm their existing attitudes. They also tend to interpret ambiguous evidence as supporting their existing position. Biased search, interpretation and memory have been invoked to explain attitude polarization (when a disagreement becomes more extreme even though the different parties are exposed to the same evidence), belief perseverance (when beliefs persist after the evidence for them is shown to be false), the irrational primacy effect (a greater reliance on information encountered early in a series) and illusory correlation (when people falsely perceive an association between two events or situations).
    What that essentially means is that people can brainwash themselves without knowing they are doing it.  In a media market dominated by corporate views people will then begin to accept those views as truth since those views come from multiple sources and do not conflict. Some people are of course, more immune than others, but it does happen to far too many people.

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

  • Recommended (141)
  • Community (60)
  • Baltimore (45)
  • Bernie Sanders (36)
  • Civil Rights (35)
  • Culture (27)
  • Elections (21)
  • Freddie Gray (21)
  • Law (20)
  • Economy (20)
  • Racism (20)
  • Education (20)
  • Hillary Clinton (19)
  • Labor (18)
  • Rescued (18)
  • Media (16)
  • Politics (16)
  • Environment (15)
  • 2016 (15)
  • Texas (15)
  • Click here for the mobile view of the site