Skip to main content

View Diary: The Bizarre Kiriakou Sentencing: Secret Evidence, Dropped Charges & New "Facts" Never Charged (70 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  Penalty is disproportionate (20+ / 0-)

    As with Bradley Manning, I would not deny that Kiriakou committed a crime. All military or intelligence agencies need to keep some secrets simply to function. If you choose to work for such agencies, you explicitly forfeit the right to reveal what you otherwise would not have known. But the penalties have been disproportionate. For Manning, a dishonorable discharge and maybe a six month sentence would seem reasonable.

    And for Kiriakou to be fired and denied a pension would be a sufficent deterrent to others who might want to violate the conditions of their employment. Physicians, social workers and many other professionals  are bound to maintain confidentiality and know that any violation can ruin their careers and Kiriakou's case is no different and deserves no greater penalty.

    And you are right, Jessica, that the bizarre ways in which these, and similar, prosecutions have been conducted set very disturbing precedents.

    If my soldiers were to begin to think, not one would remain in the ranks. -Frederick the Great

    by Valatius on Sat Jan 26, 2013 at 07:33:15 AM PST

    •  This is a case of whistleblowing (51+ / 0-)

      As Radack has pointed out elsewhere, CIA operatives are not shielded from being revealed if in the course of doing their jobs they commit crimes.  Leaving the crimes of "covert officer B" out of the discussion misses the point of the case entirely.  No one seriously believes that Kariakou was an enemy of the state who revealed names in order to harm the U.S.  He was, in fact, a patriot.  This is a lot worse than a disproportionate sentence and, no, he should not even have faced charges.

      The Congress exists primarily to ensure the reelection of members of Congress. - Bacevich

      by geomoo on Sat Jan 26, 2013 at 08:22:20 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Whistle blowing and civil disobedience (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Don midwest

        Even so, he should expect a penallty, although a proportionate one, as anyone does who chooses to commit civil disobedience. Thoreau, who defined civil disobedience, spent a night in jail for refusing to pay a tax that might have helped to fund the Mexican War hthat he opposed.

        If my soldiers were to begin to think, not one would remain in the ranks. -Frederick the Great

        by Valatius on Sat Jan 26, 2013 at 05:51:03 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  From "Civil Disobedience" (0+ / 0-)
          Law never made men a whit more just; and, by means of their respect for it, even the well-disposed are daily made the agents of injustice. A common and natural result of an undue respect for law is, that you may see a file of soldiers, colonel, captain, corporal, privates, powder-monkeys,(5) and all, marching in admirable order over hill and dale to the wars, against their wills, ay, against their common sense and consciences, which makes it very steep marching indeed, and produces a palpitation of the heart. They have no doubt that it is a damnable business in which they are concerned; they are all peaceably inclined. Now, what are they? Men at all? or small movable forts and magazines, at the service of some unscrupulous man in power?
          The important thing is the resistance to evils, not the trappings of that resistance.
        •  He should no more "expect a penalty" than (0+ / 0-)

          anyone else who reveals fucking torture.

          "I have often seen people uncivil by too much civility, and tiresome in their courtesy." Michel de Montaigne

          by JesseCW on Sat Jan 26, 2013 at 11:35:50 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  Revealing war crimes is NOT a crime. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Don midwest

      NOT revealing war crimes is a crime.

      And for Kiriakou to be fired and denied a pension would be a sufficent deterrent to others who might want to violate the conditions of their employment. Physicians, social workers and many other professionals  are bound to maintain confidentiality and know that any violation can ruin their careers and Kiriakou's case is no different and deserves no greater penalty.
      Please tell me about the social worker who was kicked out of their profession for revealing widespread war crimes.

      We don't need to dissuade anyone from doing what Kiriakou did.  We need to encourage more to do the same.

      I am deeply disappointed in many of the people who recommended your comment in favor of hiding torture.

      "I have often seen people uncivil by too much civility, and tiresome in their courtesy." Michel de Montaigne

      by JesseCW on Sat Jan 26, 2013 at 11:34:56 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site