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View Diary: Brothers and Sisters: Change, Reflection and Rebirth (83 comments)

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  •  Beautiful video, thanks. (13+ / 0-)

    I have been sitting here, nursing my glass of white and listening to its hypnotic cadence.

    I have been reading the book recommended in this venue (not in this series, I don't think), "Proof of Heaven," by Eben Alexander, written by a neurosurgeon who basically passed out one day in 2008 and ended up in the ICU for one week, in a deep coma with a horrible case of meningitis. He wasn't expected to regain consciousness. He did, and he came out of his stupor with an incredibly vivid and detailed recall of the beyond, one his medical and scientific training wouldn't admit.  

    I really admire this guy for forging ahead with this book, even though he's clearly no writer, because he believes so passionately in its content. This isn't a literary memoir. But there's plenty in it to make it worth reading.

    I am thinking about one autobiographical sequence that occurs shortly after he comes out of the coma. It's Christmas time. He shows up at this Episcopal church with his family, not because he's ever been a believer, but for family reasons--keep the wife and kids happy, and whatever. During the service, the minister has him walk to the front of the congregation to "light the advent candle." He's weak from his illness, still, and  can barely walk, but he goes up and lights this candle, on one side of the Christmas wreath. Gratefully. With devotion in his heart.

    It's a metaphor for our age. Weak and ragged, the worse for wear, and using whatever tradition is available, we offer thanks.

    It's here they got the range/ and the machinery for change/ and it's here they got the spiritual thirst. --Leonard Cohen

    by karmsy on Sun Jan 27, 2013 at 05:40:54 PM PST

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    •  I would submit that it's a metaphor for life in (8+ / 0-)

      general.

      Weak, ragged even confused and yet we humanity muddle along trying to build a better life for those that come after us.

      I've been meaning to read the book (though I confess I don't believe in heaven or 'God' ie the christian one) simply because I've heard that it's written with such passion that it's worth reading.  Hopefully I'll get to it within the next month

      •  The author is "confused" (6+ / 0-)

        --in a healthy, modernist, Western-rational way, I think--about "God," too. His family attends an Episcopal church, but he can hardly be said to "come around" to Christianity in the course of his NDE.

        It's here they got the range/ and the machinery for change/ and it's here they got the spiritual thirst. --Leonard Cohen

        by karmsy on Sun Jan 27, 2013 at 07:02:12 PM PST

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