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View Diary: Talking trash with PBS NewsHour (150 comments)

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  •  What can I do with (9+ / 0-)

    the plastic bags that bread/bagels come in, pretzels etc...?

    "Life is not about waiting for the storm to pass... it is about learning to dance in the rain." ~ Vivanne Grenne

    by remembrance on Sun Jan 27, 2013 at 11:45:55 AM PST

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    •  Ah, the magic question (16+ / 0-)

      Now you've tickled my happy place, remembrance : )

      Filmy soft plastics, like those breads come in can be added to plastics recycling binds at your local grocery store, or in our case, too, the local Ace hardware store that has collection bins out front. Heck, I even bring surplus bubble wrap and deflated air shipping pillows from my clients to this venue for recycling.

      As far as the crunchy plastic from pretzels, other crunchy snack foods, and cereal box inserts, these are the kinds of bags Sven and I use for collecting what little garbage we produce. We never purchase trash bags, because these little bags are already trash, so why not fill 'em up!

      In fact, in the NewsHour piece, there's a nice long shot the cameraman took of the "garbage" zone in our kitchen. Compost in front in the white bucket, recycling in the brown, and clipped to the latter, you'll see a Newman's Own pretzel bag hanging for trash!

      change is inevitable. growth is optional.

      by liberated spaces on Sun Jan 27, 2013 at 12:35:14 PM PST

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      •  I did catch a view (11+ / 0-)

        of your garbage area and bags, I paid attention:). Ok, no more trash bags, we can make due with what is already garbage. I'll need to talk to Glen about making a new garbage area that is accessible and convenient to us all as there is no reason to have a garbage bin in our kitchen any longer, at least not the large one we have. I'm up for recycling the plastic bags, I think there is a grocery store near me that has a bin outside.

        The packaging of food is not well thought out, i.e., whole foods. It really is less expensive to buy organics at the farmer's market, I just don't often make it there on Sunday's. So the problem is that the family owned, small chain, unionized grocery store near me has a small, very expensive and not well maintained organic produce section (the produce gets old). In fact, their groceries are so expensive that I refuse to purchase staples there.  While whole foods has a better selection but their ceo is a rwnj who won't provide health insurance to his employees. I find myself going back and forth not happy with either. My ideal grocery store would be a unionized farmer's market with local or CA made groceries with home baked breads, healthful, alternative choices to typical mass produced groceries. I haven't decided which is the least evil.

        Happy to have tickled your happy place. I'm cleaning up today so I am a grouch. The grouchiness hasn't lifted yet, Glen is hanging out in his shop.

        "Life is not about waiting for the storm to pass... it is about learning to dance in the rain." ~ Vivanne Grenne

        by remembrance on Sun Jan 27, 2013 at 12:57:40 PM PST

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        •  Here's to smaller trash bins! (11+ / 0-)

          I'm proud of you for being ready to let go of the garbage bin idea. Once you do, it's gonna be hard to look kitchen trash bins the same way ever again. I long for the day when stores like Bed, Bath & Beyond need to re-market the plethora of really expensive "garbage" (a.k.a. landfill) cans as "recycling" cans.

          Just saying no to packaged food (convenient, yes, for busy moms and dads) is one place where we can all save money and waste that in most places is destined for the landfill.

          And speaking of Whole Foods and their CEO, have you heard about his new book, "Conscious Capitalism"? I nearly choked when I saw the poster announcing the book signing at one of the nearby stores. It's ironic that he's touting this as a new "movement," when he's truly only a double-bottom line and not a true triple-bottom line kind of guy. Of the three p's – people, profit, and planet – he misses the boat on the first, so really, how conscious does he think he is?

          We'll have to hit up a farmers market together someday...

          Enjoy being grouchy. It can be fun ; )

          change is inevitable. growth is optional.

          by liberated spaces on Sun Jan 27, 2013 at 01:24:36 PM PST

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