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View Diary: "I Won't Mess Up Anymore!", a desperate child pleads (Updated) (151 comments)

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  •  Or maybe (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    aitchdee

    they have a school system that is failing their special needs child. Or maybe they are in the military and changing schools every few months or years is disruptive to their child's education and the stability of home school is much more beneficial. Maybe the child is ill and out of school more than in and this is a good way for continuity and prevention of truancy charges or kids being held back for days missed (there are districts who will hold kids back after so many days  missed even with doctor's notes). There are as many reasons to home school as there are home schooled families, though there are some groupings of them possible.

    There's nothing sociopathic about home schooling a child who's being bullied endlessly because of a disability while the school district does whatever it can to limit accessibility and an appropriate education. I would say, that if you have the ability to home school your child in that situation and you leave him in public school, that's closer to sociopathy than home schooling.

    "Madness! Total and complete madness! This never would've happened if the humans hadn't started fighting one another!" Londo Mollari

    by FloridaSNMOM on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 03:06:08 PM PST

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    •  Speaking as a parent of a child with special needs (1+ / 0-)
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      Horace Boothroyd III

      I find this even more appalling! Unless you have a teacher's certification in special education, you will do no good educationallyto a child with special needs. None. Period. Zippo.

      Don't.even.get.me.started!!!

      That you live in a school system that is failing its special needs children makes it even more imperative that you find other parents of special needs children, if necessary in other school districts and throughout your state, to ban together and fix the problem.  Likely there are groups in your state that have been around for decades that could use your help.

      This site is about gaining political clout for the needs of the common people.  If you hibernate in a home school environment you might as well join the Ayn Rand society.

      No special needs child has not been set back by being kept ut of the mainstream of society.  None.

      "Republicans have been fleeced and exploited and lied to by a conservative entertainment complex." - David Frum

      by Glinda on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 03:17:36 PM PST

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      •  Who said we were keeping them out of the (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        aitchdee

        main stream of society? We're just keeping them out of the bullying, pigeon holing, standardized mandated test taking public schools that aren't built to work with our kids.  Sorry but I disagree with your assessment of my teaching skills. My son, for example has gone from only being able to add, subtract, multiply and divide with no experience with fractions, decimals, measurement, or algebra to completing grade appropriate high school math. He's also gone from hating reading and being told he has no reading comprehension to reading novels both for education and enjoyment. He's learned history, current events, diverse cultures, chemistry, college level biology, social skills and has more friends now than he ever did in public school. He even has a girl friend.

        So we are going to have to agree to disagree on this. I don't have a degree in special education. I have however been teaching my son how to work around his autistic symptoms since before he was diagnosed. I taught him how to read, how to write, how to add before he even started kindergarten.  I think I know well how to teach my son. And he does a LOT better with one on one with minimal distractions than he ever did in a class of other kids.

        "Madness! Total and complete madness! This never would've happened if the humans hadn't started fighting one another!" Londo Mollari

        by FloridaSNMOM on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 03:30:35 PM PST

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        •  Come back to me when he's 18, 19, 20 and tell me (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Horace Boothroyd III

          how he's "well adjusted".

          You went for the easy route. You helped your son and only your son ... for the short term with blinders on for what it would mean for his young-adult and adult life.  

          It takes far more courage to fight for all kids like him and effect change.

          BTW: What you have described has been accomplished in some NYC school districts with strong parental involvement and all over the country in public school settings because parents had the commitment to facilitate great education for all students not just their own.

          "Republicans have been fleeced and exploited and lied to by a conservative entertainment complex." - David Frum

          by Glinda on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 03:39:43 PM PST

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          •  He'll be 18 in June. (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Glinda, aitchdee, Cassandra Waites

            And he's a LOT more well adjusted than he would have been without it. Fighting the school would have cost me my job and my degree because his last year I was in that school 3 or 4 days a week, WITHOUT a car, using public buses that only went out by his school every hour and a half. And I still could not get him what he needed for middle school.

            I'm not done fighting for all kids, though I'm moving out of this district now. I fought for all kids before he was in elementary school, I will do so again after. He doesn't have to be in school for me to advocate for disabled children. But he has only so many school years for me to make sure he has the best education possible. I only have so much energy and there's only so many hours in a day.

            "Madness! Total and complete madness! This never would've happened if the humans hadn't started fighting one another!" Londo Mollari

            by FloridaSNMOM on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 03:52:13 PM PST

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          •  Time Out (3+ / 0-)

            Ok before this gets overheated lets discuss this.

            in the end, it is up to all of us to work to have more inclusive schools that help all. Its better for the school and child.

            however, many schools struggle with resources, budgets, bad parents etc. In our metro many aren't even accredited.  

            home schooling for some parents is a last resort to help give their child a chance.  Is it as good as a full education with teachers and social structure?  No.  But it may be better then being routinely picked on or dismissed

            rather then dropping out of the system, some can work cooperatively with the school to receive lessons at home. Others go on their own.

            But they still need yo be advocates for better schools and fight for improvements so their need can go away for such methods

            Gandhi's Seven Sins: Wealth without work; Pleasure without conscience; Knowledge without character; Commerce without morality; Science without humanity; Worship without sacrifice; Politics without principle

            by Chris Reeves on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 03:53:49 PM PST

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            •  Pretty sure that this isn't getting overheated. (3+ / 0-)

              FloridaSNMOM and I have been very firm in our opinions but we didn't take anything personally and remained civil ... more to FloridaSNMOM's credit since my initial hyperbole invited a less cool head than hers to respond.

              Thanks for summarizing our two positions.

              "Republicans have been fleeced and exploited and lied to by a conservative entertainment complex." - David Frum

              by Glinda on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 04:17:19 PM PST

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            •  For some of us it isn't a last resort, though (1+ / 0-)
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              FloridaSNMOM

              I support public school--I vote for every single levy that comes down the pike. But homeschool was always our first choice. My girls have been homeschooled since birth and are universally described as bright, friendly, charming young women. Homeschoolers often band together in co-ops so that we can expand our children's opportunities both educationally and socially; most of us aren't actually home all that much. :)

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