Skip to main content

View Diary: Bricks, or the Damnedest Clues in the Damnedest Places (152 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  I suspect (14+ / 0-)

    that as the slaves were building the main house they would throw aside any inferior bricks and mortar mix. Then, instead of taking time to make quality bricks, the owners just had them use the discards for the slave quarters as to save on the labor and cost. Probably nothing more than what is true today - 'time is money'.

    Did you keep the brick with the child's footprint or put it back in the wall? There is a national brick collectors organization and a museum. These folks are dedicated to preserving the history of bricks. I was involved in doing a memorial years ago and they were able to give me the history of some very old bricks we used for it. One thing I found interesting is when they did paving bricks, even in the 1700s, they would spray them with saltwater to put a hardened glaze on them. The glazed side went up.

    "If fighting for a more equal and equitable distribution of the wealth of this country is socialistic, I stand guilty of being a socialist." Walter Reuther

    by fugwb on Fri Feb 15, 2013 at 10:42:50 AM PST

    •  I've done a fair amount of work now (11+ / 0-)

      in old houses (we got to gut an 1840's farmhouse that was slated for destruction and salvage the wood for restoration).  Dealing with slave labor--it seems mostly that materials were expensive but labor was cheap.  In a middle class farmhouse, we found each joist hand shaved to lay floorboards so they wouldn't squeak, and evidence of other laborious hand-fitting of relatively inexpensive materials.  Here, though, with a kiln on site (in our front field--we have a rough idea where it was) and two water-powered sawmills on the property, as well as a whole mountain of yellow pine and all the clay and sand one could want, lack of either materials or labor doesn't appear to have been the problem.

      "I speak the truth, not as much as I would, but as much as I dare, and I dare a little the more, as I grow older." --Montaigne

      by DrLori on Fri Feb 15, 2013 at 11:32:16 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  I forgot to answer your question (9+ / 0-)

      about the footprint.

      Of course I kept it out, and substituted another brick in its place.  We have another with a dog print, and we've saved out all the ones with the lot numbers inscribed.

      My husband tells strangers that Thomas Jefferson came to visit and his dog stepped on the bats.  You'd be amazed at how many people believe him.

      "I speak the truth, not as much as I would, but as much as I dare, and I dare a little the more, as I grow older." --Montaigne

      by DrLori on Fri Feb 15, 2013 at 02:44:35 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  you're probably (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Regina in a Sears Kit House

        right then. They gave the slaves inferior materials just to show them who's boss. Bastards.

        You know, maybe the dog print story isn't so far off. Wouldn't it be great to know who all visited your place over all these years? You can bet there were some very historical figures.

        "If fighting for a more equal and equitable distribution of the wealth of this country is socialistic, I stand guilty of being a socialist." Walter Reuther

        by fugwb on Fri Feb 15, 2013 at 02:57:50 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site