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View Diary: TRIGGER WARNING: Reading this post will give you nightmares (256 comments)

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  •  The role of the police in our society... (12+ / 0-)

    is to terrorize the general populace into submission. They only protect & serve the owner class in a legalized protection racket. It is work fit for (and appealing to) thugs and bullies, so incidents such as this should not surprise. If a stray decent human wanders into their ranks, s/he will most likely be corrupted in short order. A good cop is as rare and peculiar a thing as a compassionate conservative. Empowered civilian oversight would be a great thing, but seems unlikely anytime soon. It would defeat their purpose. Only when all of the other unions have been smashed and the will of the people broken will the rulers turn on their instruments and demand a modicum of accountability.

    You show a little grit and you lands in jail.

    by cal2010 on Tue Feb 19, 2013 at 09:10:48 AM PST

    •  Don't forget car lockouts. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      raincrow

      I terrorized literally hundreds of innocent civilians by breaking into their cars when they had locked their keys inside back when I was an LEO.  I'm not sure how this benefited my owner-class overlords, but I sure got good at popping the locks on late vehicles.

      That said, your point about better civilian oversight is astute.

      I think we also need more federal oversight for cases of police brutality by local and state law enforcement.

      •  Federal oversight would be a nice thing too. (4+ / 0-)

        But wouldn't it more likely than not turn into one more area for Eric Holder to do nothing about other than somehow use to further lock in his next gig as the top paid corporate lawyer ever? Or create some other official to appear before a legislative committee and be asked, if we're lucky even, who was the last dirty cop you took to trial? An exaggeration, perhaps, but much evidence points in this general direction. No useful, good or productive legislation will come out of Boehner's House, anyhow. So we're at least two, but more likely greater than four years out from any worthwhile Federal action on anything. Best we can hope for there is not to hit the debt ceiling. For the issue here, the best defense we have at present are cameras everywhere - with internet connections and (slowly) increasing bandwidth for faster (unstored password protected) uploads before devices are confiscated. With this, we can catch the spectacularly dumb ones after the fact and dispense some occasional justice.

        You show a little grit and you lands in jail.

        by cal2010 on Tue Feb 19, 2013 at 10:17:25 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Password protection won't do any good because (0+ / 0-)

          they can just extract the passwords (or oauth tokens) from the device and use that to log in and delete the videos.  What we need is livestreaming software and sites that support two passwords, one for uploading video only and another for managing/deleting video.  That way the worst they can do is try to upload fake videos even if they get access.

          You have watched Faux News, now lose 2d10 SAN.

          by Throw The Bums Out on Wed Feb 20, 2013 at 02:57:08 AM PST

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          •  More is better, certainly, (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Throw The Bums Out

            and live beats upload but if you don't ever store the password, or have the browser or app remember it, there is nothing there to extract. Obviously, you'd need to at least logout (or even shutdown) before your phone is grabbed. This may not hold true for every device, but any that would retain a web site/app password that was never intentionally stored/saved after shutdown are highly defective. And then you've got your apps that will reset the device to factory settings...

            You show a little grit and you lands in jail.

            by cal2010 on Wed Feb 20, 2013 at 11:09:03 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  And do the same (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Throw The Bums Out

              for any email associated with the video account, so dirty cop can't try "Forgot my password" feature to retrieve or reset it. Best to not even use that email account with the device at all. That should be quite sufficient to fluster Fullerton's not so finest (or equivalent) as the clip circulates.

              You show a little grit and you lands in jail.

              by cal2010 on Wed Feb 20, 2013 at 11:22:50 AM PST

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            •  Actually, they can freeze the phone to extract the (0+ / 0-)

              passwords from the device's RAM after a shutdown.  That is known as a cold boot attack as data in RAM does not disappear instantly when the power is cut and the time it takes to fade can be increased to minutes instead of just seconds if you can get the memory below freezing.

              You have watched Faux News, now lose 2d10 SAN.

              by Throw The Bums Out on Wed Feb 20, 2013 at 06:57:54 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  It'd take more than standard issue equipment (0+ / 0-)

                typically available in a squad car to pull that off. Is a cop, such as those featured in this story, more likely to successfully draw and identify the relevant series of passwords off of several phones or destroy the phones in an attempt to freeze the RAM? Not saying these efforts are infeasible, but unlikely. It's only YouTube level data anyhow, not WikiLeaks worthy. Here's another approach: send off a prepared multi platform alert (SMS/email/tweet/FB update/etc.) to everyone you know alerting them to change your account password. If you can't make a secret of it, then share it all around. So it's a race. And once you've sent off the alert, smash the phone rather than hand it over. Low tech has it's uses too. Get it wet if possible. Sure, it's still recoverable but it puts a good bit of time on the clock and that's all that's needed.

                You show a little grit and you lands in jail.

                by cal2010 on Wed Feb 20, 2013 at 11:20:08 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

      •  my friend's father locked his keys in his car (9+ / 0-)

        when the cops came, they arrested him for trying to break into a car, and then roughed him up for resisting arrest.

        i bet you can guess what the man's race was.

      •  General vs. particular (7+ / 0-)

        This is pretty basic.  In general, cops work to protect either their own interests or the interests of the powerful (most of who in the US are wealthy).  Look at the numbers on who gets arrested, who gets imprisoned, who gets beaten to death, who gets harassed. Not the powerful, not the rich.  NYPD directly moonlights for Wall Street banks. Cops arrest and beat protesters, not oligarchs.  This is so obvious I will not continue.  

        This does not mean that every single activity ever undertaken by every single cop is directly related to defending the oligarchy and oppressing the rest of us.  Cops also fill out paperwork, unlock car doors, and take lunch breaks, and joy ride in their cars with lights on because it makes them feel cool.  There is no principle of logic by which these obvious facts controvert the claim that cops exists to protect the powerful--that this is their basic political and social function.  How they do this is by demanding slave-like obedience to every command, no matter how stupid or degrading, upon punishment of imprisonment, beatings, or death.

    •  No, That's not Correct (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      emptythreatsfarm, raincrow, WakeUpNeo

      That is a cynical view fed by focusing only on the bad and not the good that the police do. I do not dispute that there are way too many incidents of police behaving in shocking ways and that we clearly have trouble with holding them accountable for their actions. But there are over 600,000 police offices in the US and most of them are decent men and women that do their best to serve and protect their communities. The largest problem is the "Blue Code of Silence" which in effect requires that the majority of decent police officers overlook the transgressions of the rotten apples.

      There are many systemic problems with our Police that need to be addressed and certainly some communities have Police Departments that are known to be particular vile. But feeding the line that the purpose of police is to put people down is not accurate. The purpose of police is to maintain order and create a safe environment for people to go about their lives which they accomplish for the most part, despite the fact that the general population is among the most heavily armed in the world. I guarantee that you would not like to live in a nation without a functioning police force.

      •  Decent men and women doing their best (6+ / 0-)

        to serve and protect their communities do not observe a "blue code of silence" and participate in covering up the crimes and offenses of their fellow officers.

        If most of them do, as you claim, observe such a code then most of them are not "good cops".

        income gains to the top 1% from 2009 to 2011 were 121% of all income increases. How did that happen? Incomes to the bottom 99% fell by 0.4%

        by JesseCW on Tue Feb 19, 2013 at 11:04:01 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  This is beyond a bad few apples. (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        lyvwyr101, cal2010, kyril, Hubbard Squash

        If you still believe that you are not paying attention.

        We can't fix this until the denial stops.

        "Til you're so fucking crazy you can't follow their rules" John Lennon - Working Class Hero

        by Horace Boothroyd III on Tue Feb 19, 2013 at 11:06:12 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Ignore the transgressions of the rotten apples... (3+ / 0-)

        and what becomes of the bushel? Any of those 600,000 who suspects the integrity of a fellow officer and isn't working that case (or dreaming of it in their restless sleep) this very moment in time surrenders the claim to decency in performance of their duties. They may not be accessories, but they are not a good cop by any stretch. The systematic problems will not be addressed, they are not new and they never have been handled in an enduring fashion. A few higher ups retired early, a handful of prosecutions now and then. That is all. Nothing long lasting. I do not live in nation with a police force that functions for me.

        You show a little grit and you lands in jail.

        by cal2010 on Tue Feb 19, 2013 at 02:53:51 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

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