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View Diary: Doggy Mug Shots (Your Laugh of the Day) Part 1 - Updated (205 comments)

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  •  Our dog ate a whole easter basket full (19+ / 0-)

    of chocolate and at least one Halloween bag full.  She lived on till 15.  She also would go throught the garbage and eat the chicken bones if no one watched her.  I always wonder if those prohibitions are true.

    Everyone! Arms akimbo!

    by tobendaro on Tue Feb 19, 2013 at 11:35:13 AM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  supposedly it varies greatly based on the dog (13+ / 0-)

      for some, only a small amount is toxic

    •  chicken bones are the canine russian roulette (20+ / 0-)

      it might snap and lodge, or it might not

      "I'm sculpting now. Landscapes mostly." ~ Yogi Bear

      by eXtina on Tue Feb 19, 2013 at 12:32:05 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Pure chocolate can be dangerous (17+ / 0-)

      to dogs and cats, grapes and raisins are dangerous to some dogs (read all dogs since there is no tried and true way to know), and some houseplants.

      That said, I know of lots of dogs who have lived thru a chocolate attack and one of my cats loves mr.u's mocha coffee and drinks it out of the cup if we are watching.

      I think that a lot of mixes contain way more "chocolate flavor" than actual chocolate.

      I love "Dog Shaming" and the red velvet cat is really funny!

      "The scientific nature of the ordinary man is to go on out and do the best you can." John Prine

      by high uintas on Tue Feb 19, 2013 at 12:33:31 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Raw poultry bones are ok, (10+ / 0-)

      As long as the quantity is not in excess (doesn't cause the dog to bloat).

      Cooked bones (of all types) DO splinter and absolutely can cause serious GI damage, which can be painful, expensive (surgery may be necessary) and fatal if an intestine is perforated.

      After I toss cooked bones in the kitchen garbage, I immediately tie off the bag and out it in the outside garbage.

      Everyone has or knows a dog that survived eating chocolate or cooked bones "just fine." But we or our friends have survived texting while driving "just fine" too.

      It depends in what else is in the stomach at the time, that particular bone (how long was it cooked  and how? Bones braised in fluid may be less likely to splinter than bones of chicken grilled to slightly overdone on a bar-b-que. the dog's age is an issue. Young dogs have better GI motility than older dogs. Did the dog gulp the bones or chew them carefully?)

      I try not be be paranoid. There are things on the ASPCA toxins list I  disregard to a great extent for my own dogs. But bones and chocolate are not them.

      And if you don't know why they're on the list and exactly why you're disregarding them -- and to exactly what level -- you really should not.

      People do lose their dogs over such stupid things. And not to be crass, but they often lose their dogs after they've spent a lot of money trying desperately to save them.

      It's just not worth it. Get a heavy covered/ locking garbage can; put it in a cabinet. Never put bones or other attractive unsafe food in the inside garbage. Homes with counter cruisers should never leave food on the counter (I had a big breadbox that I could safely leave food temporarily in).

      © grover


      So if you get hit by a bus tonight, would you be satisfied with how you spent today, your last day on earth? Live like tomorrow is never guaranteed, because it's not. -- Me.

      by grover on Tue Feb 19, 2013 at 01:41:22 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Thank you so much for this info (6+ / 0-)

        You may not be paranoid about this kind of thing, but I sure as hell am! :)

        Frances (6 yo, 17 lb, female schnoodle lovebug) is my first and only dog and I wonder sometimes if I don't love her more than life itself. If anything were to happen that could have been prevented had I known better or been more alert, I think I'd fall over and die. And I don't think I'm exaggerating, not one bit. (For example--just a quick story--she got out of the house without me for the first time ever via the patio gate last Sunday night when I had just stepped into the carport area "real quick" with an armload of recycling. When I returned inside and realized she wasn't there--anywhere--I swear to God my knees buckled. I steadied myself fast, but my first thought was, How will I manage to search for her if I pass out first? LOL. Anyway, she was just outside the gate, waiting for me, wagging. So all was well. But I am SUCH a freakout when it comes to her!)

        I appreciate your posts, Grover. For me, there's no such thing as too careful.

        God bless our tinfoil hearts.

        by aitchdee on Tue Feb 19, 2013 at 04:08:56 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I keep a portable gate (7+ / 0-)

          near my door to keep the cats from rushing the door.  In my previous apartments, chase the kitty was down a hallway.  Now, it's the great big outdoors,

          You can never be too cautious.  As much as they're trained, the lure of a bird or squirrel can be too much.

          There already is class warfare in America. Unfortunately, the rich are winning.

          by Puddytat on Tue Feb 19, 2013 at 04:13:25 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Also, Home Depot and all hardware stores (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            diggerspop, Puddytat, ColoTim, aitchdee

            Stock tightly-wound springs that you attach one side to the gate and one side to the wall on which the gate is hung. It usually just takes a couple screws.

            If the wall is a brick wall, it will require an extra anchor bolt and some drilling. A handyman can do this pretty quickly if you're not handy with tools.

            Then, once the spring is installed, your gate will immediately close behind you whenever you go in and out. But with you shoulder or hips, you can push the gate open and with an  elbow or a foot, you can pull it open going the other direction, even if your arms are full.

            I have them on all our gates. The cost and inconvenience are minimal. The security is precious.

            And it also prevents ultility workers or others from inadvertently leaving your gate open. Unless uou have a smart devious dog, many even won't try a gate that appears to closed.

            © grover


            So if you get hit by a bus tonight, would you be satisfied with how you spent today, your last day on earth? Live like tomorrow is never guaranteed, because it's not. -- Me.

            by grover on Tue Feb 19, 2013 at 06:41:36 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Thanks for the suggestions, but I rent (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              ColoTim, aitchdee

              Screws in the woodwork or anywhere else are prohibited.

              There already is class warfare in America. Unfortunately, the rich are winning.

              by Puddytat on Tue Feb 19, 2013 at 09:17:48 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Actually, I was adding to your comment, (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Puddytat, Byrnt, aitchdee

                But speaking to aitchdee. Your set-up sounds great for you. I was thinking of her patio gate.

                This was one of those weird cases when I couldn't decide if it made sense to further the conversation or create a parallel comment.

                I chose wrong. Heh, I usually do.

                :)

                © grover


                So if you get hit by a bus tonight, would you be satisfied with how you spent today, your last day on earth? Live like tomorrow is never guaranteed, because it's not. -- Me.

                by grover on Tue Feb 19, 2013 at 11:19:43 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  I hadn't heard of this kind of thing but (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Puddytat

                  honestly, it sounds like the best thing since sliced bagels. Thanks so much for mentioning it! It's been quite a juggling act trying to bring multiple bags of groceries into the house from the carport and keep that gate shut behind me each time I go in and out. I will look into this set up for sure.

                  Now for the slider, the outlet to the patio. Wish it would shut automatically somehow. ;)

                  God bless our tinfoil hearts.

                  by aitchdee on Wed Feb 20, 2013 at 04:36:01 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  No kidding. (2+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    Puddytat, aitchdee

                    One of my dogs is brilliant at opening the slider. He hasn't learned to close it.

                    Then again, I'm not sure he really cares enough to learn to.

                    During the summer, at least, the magnetic screen doors actually work incredibly well. Mr grover said he wanted to order some. So we got them on amazon. I'm amazed how well they hold up and keep bugs out.

                    So that's a sort of option, although they're not secure at all.

                    © grover


                    So if you get hit by a bus tonight, would you be satisfied with how you spent today, your last day on earth? Live like tomorrow is never guaranteed, because it's not. -- Me.

                    by grover on Wed Feb 20, 2013 at 11:18:57 AM PST

                    [ Parent ]

    •  Our doxie did that too (9+ / 0-)

      (demolished a whole, very generous Easter basket) The basket's owner is now 25 and she STILL brings that up as a traumatic childhood memory. The candy thief-dachshund lived several more years before dying of old age.

    •  Our rottie, German shepherd and blood hound (6+ / 0-)

      mix pound puppy got the kids' Halloween and Easter candy off and on for several years until we all got careful enough to be sure it was never in her reach.

      She also managed to eat sticks of butter left too close to the counter edge, turquoise modeling clay (talk about beautiful shit) and a Christmas ornament - only the wire hanger protruded out of each end of a segment of poop.

      There were other things on the lawn stolen from trash. I finally got a large step-on metal trash can for the kitchen she couldn't get into. A smaller one for the bathroom. I'll never forget the look on her face when she figured out they were beyond her skills.

      The only thing she ever passed up were coffee beans or grounds.

      For her breed and specific medical problems, she did well to make 12. And that combination of breeds resulted in the perfect kid pet. She adored them and scared all strangers that came on the property uninvited to leave at Olympic speed.

      That's my no mug shots picture of a wonderful dog. I was very careful with her successor, who was nowhere near as interested in food or trash.

      "People, even more than things, have to be restored, renewed, revived, reclaimed and redeemed; never throw out anyone. " Audrey Hepburn "A Beautiful Woman"

      by Ginny in CO on Tue Feb 19, 2013 at 02:56:24 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  My dog stole all kinds of stuff` (6+ / 0-)

      we still regale guests with his adventures in culinary excess.

      But...when he was old, half blind, deaf and arthritic he managed to sneak a chicken bone out of some Ivy on a walk.  At least that is the only time he could have done it, and the only place that was likely.

      It killed him.  Punctured his intestines.

      This is a dog that had eaten 8 pound of frozen chicken (his stomach was cold), ate an entire plastic pill case (the kind with one compartment per day of week) with pills inside, hoovered up an entire table of party-type food (even eating the veggies, and licking the dip containers clean), ate a plate of chocolate cookies, ate a number of sandwiches with bag on (one inflated in his stomach which was mildly alarming), and scarfed any number of dubious things outdoors, with no ill effects aside from a little bit of the runs after the pillcase incident (and little doors from the pillcase came out all week).

      It just takes once.  Moose was lucky that it happened after he'd had a full life of being a rascal.

      •  So it can happen. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Puddytat, Byrnt

        I never knew anyone who had an issue but it seems many dogs get a hold of them.  I am sorry you had to go through that.

        Everyone! Arms akimbo!

        by tobendaro on Tue Feb 19, 2013 at 06:18:34 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yes, (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Puddytat, ColoTim, tobendaro

          And dogs learn bad behavior. Every time they sneak food and get away with it, they're rewarded with an interesting if not actually yummy meal.

          So that makes them even more motivated next time.

          So all the people who say to me, "my dog gets into chocolate and chicken bones and whatever else all the time, and he's always just fine!" I usually just shrug.

          Because that person's dog has a much higher probability of a fatal encounter than, say, my dog who may happen across a house guest's chocolate bar in their open suitcase.  The chances of my dog funding a chocolate bar is pretty minimal, and I manage my house and my dogs (and frankly, my house guests) so the dogs can't get near anything dangerous.

          For the other dog owner, though, it's just a matter of time. Do catastrophic injestion accidents happen to cautious owners? They do. But the chances are much lower.

          © grover


          So if you get hit by a bus tonight, would you be satisfied with how you spent today, your last day on earth? Live like tomorrow is never guaranteed, because it's not. -- Me.

          by grover on Tue Feb 19, 2013 at 07:47:33 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

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