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View Diary: When gun control is outlawed... (144 comments)

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  •  They're entitled, of course (12+ / 0-)

    to do what they want with their business. And we're entitled to speak out about it and shame them for it. This is their founder, Richard Fitzpatrick.

    Fitzpatrick said his company is serious.

    "It's not really a threat. It's a promise," he said.

    They always use that line, don't they? I'm not as keen on threats (or promises) as I am for consequences. I wonder if the police affected by this loyalty oath nonsense can take their business elsewhere, en masse.

    We demanded a plan to reduce gun violence. Now it's time to demand a vote.

    by tytalus on Mon Mar 04, 2013 at 12:40:18 PM PST

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    •  I don't get these loyalty oaths anyway. (6+ / 0-)

      Sign the loyalty oath and then ignore it. How is anyone possibly going to track what a cop does on the job?
      I'm guessing this guy thinks officers shouldn't be arresting people who are breaking the law by owning an illegal weapon or arresting people who buy guns off the street.

      “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

      by skohayes on Mon Mar 04, 2013 at 03:15:48 PM PST

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      •  I wouldn't put it past a conservative (4+ / 0-)

        to try to track law enforcement, or to sue. It reminds me of some provisions of Arizona's SB 1070 that allowed AZ residents to sue law enforcement if they thought the police weren't being sufficiently vigilant.

        We demanded a plan to reduce gun violence. Now it's time to demand a vote.

        by tytalus on Mon Mar 04, 2013 at 03:30:37 PM PST

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        •  Yeah, I remember that (5+ / 0-)

          I just don't see how a private company could enforce it.
          I was looking up loyalty oaths a while back and was reminded of this:

          During the 2004 presidential campaign, the campaign of George W. Bush routinely required all attendants at its rallies to take what some have called a "loyalty oath". Those who refused to take the oath were not allowed to attend the rally. The "loyalty oath" was actually a pledge of endorsement. These endorsements were used during some of the campaign rallies in 2004. The Bush campaign asserted that the oath was valid because the president was conducting a partisan campaign event. Opponents countered that the oath was intrusive to individual conscience, somewhat fascist in nature and denied general public access to the president.

          “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

          by skohayes on Mon Mar 04, 2013 at 04:26:33 PM PST

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      •  I would be a little surprised (4+ / 0-)

        if one of the oaths of office of police officers doesn't already swear to uphold the Constitution, the Bill of RIghts and the Laws of the land. You'd think that might be standard issue.
        So this company is asking for something they have already done.
        That means they don't trust Law Enforcement? And if so, what good is making them swear an oath to a company?
        Seriously whack.
        How many jobs are they holding hostage?

        If I ran this circus, things would be DIFFERENT!

        by CwV on Mon Mar 04, 2013 at 05:34:20 PM PST

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      •  It's a juevenile copy cat of Grover Norquist's (4+ / 0-)

        tax pledge.

        "They did not succeed in taking away our voice" - Angelique Kidjo - Opening the Lightning In a Bottle concert at Radio City Music Hall in New York City - 2003

        by LilithGardener on Mon Mar 04, 2013 at 06:05:35 PM PST

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