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View Diary: Negotiations over universal background checks collapse. Senate committee marking up four gun bills (207 comments)

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  •  Tom Cowburn seems willing to granstand his way (9+ / 0-)

    right out of a compromise.

    Which of the two is grandstanding FOR the status quo?

    "They did not succeed in taking away our voice" - Angelique Kidjo - Opening the Lightning In a Bottle concert at Radio City Music Hall in New York City - 2003

    by LilithGardener on Thu Mar 07, 2013 at 08:51:13 AM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  both (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      noway2, Tom Seaview

      Coburn is for the NRA status quo, Schumer is for the HCI/Brady status quo.  Each claims a moral imperative and Schumer wants a defacto nation-wide gun registry with open database for any and all who are deemed worthy of viewing.

      Cops?  Certainly.
      University or Government-funded Researchers?  Oh yes.
      Reporters?  Why not.  Right-to-Know don'tcha know.
      Bloggers?  Aren't we the new Reporters?

      When Los Maras use a Blogger® request to view your firearms records, and sticks a knife an inch into your child just to show how serious they are about taking your firearms?
      No Papi, ALL of them.

      The hue and cry will be not for reasonably sealed records available to law enforcement only.
      The demand will be for ALL firearms to leave civilian hands... started right here on DKos.

      Can't KEEP your gun, because your child's life is more important than someone else's child?  FUCK YOU.
      No guns for you EVER.  WE did what was right and listed EVERY gun for everyone to see.
      YOU were the fucktard who kept a gun in the house and painted a big TARGET SYMBOL on YOUR child.

      At least it was on YOUR CHILD - for a change.

      Schumer's fine with that - as the hue and cry will be for total confiscation, which if you view his comment history as a member of Congress, is very consistent.

      "The bill's sponsor has a better chance of being the next Pope" ~ attributed to Rep. Eric Burlison of Missouri

      by 43north on Thu Mar 07, 2013 at 11:14:37 AM PST

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      •  child, torturously knifed to ensure compliance.? (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        LilithGardener, tytalus

        ...your proffered prediction for the impending changes to the status quo seems extreme.

        Cheers.

        •  And yet when CC permit holders names and (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          OMwordTHRUdaFOG

          addresses have been published, reports indicated homes getting burglarized as a result.  Taking hostages or killing to obtain them isn't that much of a stretch, especially for certain types of criminals.

        •  I've worked in situations (0+ / 0-)

          where the Columbians in metro-NY have compelled the attention of others by delivery of recognizable body parts to the parents.  Parents who were accused of holding-out on a total and complete delivery of body-packed cocaine.
          Cocaine that was "lifted" from the count in Columbia, leaving the "mule" "short" in New York.

          I've seen the Russian Mob do worse.

          Your viewpoint reflects your values, not those of persons who have less regard for you, than a 5 cent returnable beverage bottle.  
          You're not worth a nickel.  
          You're completely disposable upon consumption.

          "The bill's sponsor has a better chance of being the next Pope" ~ attributed to Rep. Eric Burlison of Missouri

          by 43north on Fri Mar 08, 2013 at 06:33:55 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  in the circumstances you describe, you're not... (0+ / 0-)

            ...worth a nickel, unless you're worth a nickel.

            'Course, that's just my perspective, speaking as I do from direct and successful experience working and living in some of the most intense examples of that sort of environment in the world. NY-metro to upcountry in a buncha civil-war-torn nations, first-hand realities do go beyond what most folks can imagine or would care to imagine.

            Nonetheless, that's not Mainstreet US, so acknowledging those realities is one thing, and attempting to use those situations to promote an anti-reasonable-regulation position is definitely something quite different.

            Cheers.

      •  That fear is very palpable is some places (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        BachFan, 43north

        and if I lived in Maricopa County I certainly wouldn't want Sheriff Joe or any of his volunteer posse to have access to a list of where all the firearms are.

        I'm not one of those who assumes the fear of confiscation is irrational.

        The other end of the spectrum is a place like New York city.

        We know what fear is.

        New York passed its first gun restriction law in 1910. As far as I know there has never been systematic gun confiscation in New York, such as what took place in the New Orlean's area after Katrina.

        It's my opinion things changed for New York when businesses demanded an opportunity to compete by simply running a business, rather than by running a business in a quasi war zone. Their workers didn't want to live here. They had to pay people higher wages to commute in. The wealthy wanted to live here but didn't want to come and go through a quasi war zone. Property values were depressed.

        Gun buybacks and voluntary compliance were what made the difference. I'm not aware of any mandatory confiscation, despite 100 hundred years of gun restrictions.

        Yes, some people still have firearms, and they must have a concealed carry permit, which requires an application and review/approval by the police. Sure, there are firearms in civilian hands in NYC, but for the most part no one knows where they are because they must be concealed.

        Millions of residents in NYC live behind nothing but the security of their front door, and sometimes an unarmed doorman with security cameras in the elevators and stair wells.

        NYC has 17,000 schools, 1.1 million students, 635,000 K-8 students, and zero mass school shootings.

        It's not that we lack fear.

        We do know how easily marshal law could be imposed and enforced here. On 9/11, shortly after the towers were hit trains bridges and tunnels closed. Soon after they were restricted to outbound transit only, for many the only home was to walk out.

        We know what fear is.

        "They did not succeed in taking away our voice" - Angelique Kidjo - Opening the Lightning In a Bottle concert at Radio City Music Hall in New York City - 2003

        by LilithGardener on Thu Mar 07, 2013 at 11:42:06 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Actually, NYC did perform a confiscation. (0+ / 0-)

          Here's a bit of resulting case law.

          "Local Law 78" as-written prohibited the sale, possession and transfer of any "assault weapon" possessed within the confines of the City of New York.  "Surrender to Authorities" by a certain date was required in the first (adopted) version.

          This prohibition extended to all current and former law enforcement officers too, and resulted in a hasty-rewrite permitting sale or transfer out of the City confines.
          Thus avoiding in some instances, confiscation by the City.

          If it exempted LEOs?  It would have remained unchanged, unless acted-upon via litigation.  Taking >$500 guns from cops has consequences, which from what I read wasn't recalled by Governor Cuomo in the latest "7 round" legislation.

          "The bill's sponsor has a better chance of being the next Pope" ~ attributed to Rep. Eric Burlison of Missouri

          by 43north on Fri Mar 08, 2013 at 06:18:52 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

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