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View Diary: DKos Tour Series: White Sands National Monument (92 comments)

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  •  My daughter says one of the most beautiful (17+ / 0-)

    scenes she's ever experienced is camping at White Sands National Monument on a full-moon night. She and her friend carried their tents and gear a fair distance from where they parked the car and she said it was so bright they didn't need additional light. Magical.

    The world is not interested in the storms you encountered, but did you bring in the ship.

    by Hanging Up My Tusks on Wed Mar 27, 2013 at 08:27:30 AM PDT

    •  full moon nights. . . (11+ / 0-)

      I had a similar experience, but also lizards messing about my sleeping bag (I NEVER use a tent!). Of course, what sleep? I mean, that big, yellowish orb was in my eyes for most of the night. Agreeing with your daughter, it is quite the outdoors experience camping out in the monument and seeing a big, fat and full moon so close you can almost reach out and touch it. Almost! If she has any pics of that camping experience and wants to share. . .post 'em on this commentator's site, because I think the DKos community will enjoy sharing the experience (vicariously), of course. Thanks for posting your comment, Hanging Up My Tusk!

      Treat the world (yourself, and others) as part of a living organism. Everyone and everything will benefit.

      by richholtzin on Wed Mar 27, 2013 at 08:47:50 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Her camping experience at WS was approx 25 years (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        RiveroftheWest, Larsstephens

        ago and any photos she might have (I've never seen any of this particular trip) are non-digital and packed so far away it would take months to unearth. Other than that, I'd love to post photos. That area is spectacular and I think those seeing it for the first time are dumbfounded at the purity and brightness of the dunes.

        Thanks for writing and posting this series on our national parks. Great opportunity for us to see those out-of-the-way parks we might never have a chance to visit in person.

        The world is not interested in the storms you encountered, but did you bring in the ship.

        by Hanging Up My Tusks on Wed Mar 27, 2013 at 12:14:21 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  I was too chicken to camp here (2+ / 0-)
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        RiveroftheWest, qofdisks

        I was afraid of snakes and other critters and was alone. Too bad. I bet the sky show was unbelievable on a moonless and cloudless night.

        "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

        by kovie on Wed Mar 27, 2013 at 07:26:36 PM PDT

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    •  Yes. just like in the winter up north with snow. (4+ / 0-)

      We had last full moon of the winter.  It is so amazing at night when you outside.

      •  what is it about full moons. . . (4+ / 0-)

        do you think? Spiritual? Human and animal instinct? What about so-called "Biological time?" I'm thinking the latter, but I also think, as you and most others do, full moons are dreamy and magical. Thanks for posting (again).

        Treat the world (yourself, and others) as part of a living organism. Everyone and everything will benefit.

        by richholtzin on Wed Mar 27, 2013 at 10:37:18 AM PDT

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        •  Probably because full moons give you a glimpse of (4+ / 0-)

          a world that is usually shrouded in darkness.

          In areas without a lot of light pollution, it can be truly magical.  

          •  and that'll work. . . (4+ / 0-)

            as in, "Mr. Moon. . .you light up my life!" Well, you know. Bortles Dark Sky places, like Natural Bridges and Death Valley, are magical given the intensity of the cosmos over such places. I remember when I was living in Prescott (Arizona), before moving, first, to Blue Diamond (Nevada), then to Tucson, and god knows everywhere else since. . .how wonderful Prescott's night show was. It sits at about a mile-high in the atmosphere, and of course the closest and largest city is Phoenix; it's also in the mountain country, and somewhat dry. So, that's one of the reasons why night-sky observation, especially for DSO's, was always epic. Haven't seen anything like it since I took a couple of astronomy courses, at Kitt Peak.

            Treat the world (yourself, and others) as part of a living organism. Everyone and everything will benefit.

            by richholtzin on Wed Mar 27, 2013 at 11:19:59 AM PDT

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            •  Prescott...somewhat dry....LOL. (3+ / 0-)

              Sounds like you've spent a bit of time enjoying the wonders of the southwest. When I lived in Louisiana I remember talking with someone who'd driven through the southwest and this person said, "There's nothing to see there." Au contraire, you can see EVERYTHING there.

              The world is not interested in the storms you encountered, but did you bring in the ship.

              by Hanging Up My Tusks on Wed Mar 27, 2013 at 12:19:44 PM PDT

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              •  nothing to see in the Southwest. . . (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                RiveroftheWest, helpImdrowning

                that's anything like the rest of the country. I think that person should've added that much. Do you think? Well, it's not bayou country, that's for sure and damn certain. HA!

                Treat the world (yourself, and others) as part of a living organism. Everyone and everything will benefit.

                by richholtzin on Wed Mar 27, 2013 at 12:21:55 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  A couple of weeks prior to this conversation, my (4+ / 0-)

                  partner and I had taken a trip to the northwestern corner of Arkansas and had been driving in the Beaver Lake area (gorgeous country) where you literally couldn't see the forest for the trees. Big contrast with the southwest where there are precious few forests to see. That said, beauty to behold in every corner of our globe if your eyes and mind are open to appreciation.

                  The world is not interested in the storms you encountered, but did you bring in the ship.

                  by Hanging Up My Tusks on Wed Mar 27, 2013 at 02:47:47 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

      •  Gorgeous full moon out tonight here in NY (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        RiveroftheWest

        Makes one want to howl.

        "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

        by kovie on Wed Mar 27, 2013 at 07:28:50 PM PDT

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        •  if you don't howl loud enough. . . (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          kovie, RiveroftheWest, greengemini

          kovie, then how are you going to find the pack you belong to??? Send us a picture. And where, in New York, are you harbored? If that full moon is what I first saw anchored over the  Adirondack profile . . . make way for me . . . it was so gorgeous in its creamy appearance it made me think. . .am I on the planet, Earth, or somewhere else? (Hope I spelled that mountain range key-recklee!)

          Treat the world (yourself, and others) as part of a living organism. Everyone and everything will benefit.

          by richholtzin on Wed Mar 27, 2013 at 07:50:29 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Nah, down in more prosaic Queens (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            RiveroftheWest, greengemini

            Although there are racoons, feral chickens and a small woods nearby.

            "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

            by kovie on Wed Mar 27, 2013 at 08:13:28 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  hey. . .it's wildlife of a sort...right? (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              kovie

              thanks, kovie, and living in prosaic Queens. . .that has to be good enough. Look at all that humanity you're exposed to on any given day. And those raccoons will always keep you honest regarding what you do or don't do with your trash and such. Or outdoor cat or dog feed. I love those bandits. In the Grand Canyon we have an even slicker raccoon-type, called a "ringtail cat" (related to raccoons, but craftier and far more adaptable due to the heavy heat of the inner canyon). Check 'em out online and see the pics. They are rascals to the max. Anyway, I love all creatures great and small (that's why a lot of my field institute student-trekkers sometimes called me "Doc Suess, the second!).

              Get out in those 'small woods' more often, because sometimes doing the Thoreau thing is all that we have to bridge our reality with imaginations and dreaming. . .Nature's bounty and all that stuff.

              Treat the world (yourself, and others) as part of a living organism. Everyone and everything will benefit.

              by richholtzin on Thu Mar 28, 2013 at 06:20:33 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Trust me, I do (0+ / 0-)

                I've always been lucky with living near parks and nature. Even when I lived in the concrete jungle of Manhattan years ago, I was a block from Central Park and its (admittedly mostly man-made) "wilderness", that in some sections actually felt like real wilderness, with red-tailed hawks and black squirrels.

                I think I've seen ringtails in zoos. Are they related to red pandas?

                "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

                by kovie on Thu Mar 28, 2013 at 08:21:24 AM PDT

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                •  nope. . .they're raccoons. . . (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  kovie

                  only a slimmer species and they can climb straight up the Vishnu schist or granite walls. They also sleep all day and raise hell all night long. . .backpacker's are their favorite people of all. Go figure why. Concrete jungle, eh? I lived in Paris for a long time and none of that concrete canyon country there. But what would the Big Apple be without its tall buildings and such?

                  Treat the world (yourself, and others) as part of a living organism. Everyone and everything will benefit.

                  by richholtzin on Thu Mar 28, 2013 at 09:17:13 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Paris lacks NYC's tall buildings for the most part (0+ / 0-)

                    But it's a different sort of urban jungle, in its case one of monumental history, political, cultural and literal. You can't walk through it without feeling at least somewhat oppressed or at least overwhelmed by its history and the unhumble character of its architecture, which as beautiful and interesting as it often is was clearly intended to impress and intimidate and make you know your place.

                    "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

                    by kovie on Thu Mar 28, 2013 at 09:34:23 AM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

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