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View Diary: Lanny Breuer Resigns from Department of Justice, Joins Wall Street Law Firm (231 comments)

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  •  In other words ... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    davybaby

    ... you think that the protections of the Bill of Rights should only be vigorously enforced on behalf of defendants you like.

    •  After all, drug prosecutors constantly go (5+ / 0-)

      to work for drug dealers after spending years in public office refusing to vigorously pursue them.

      It happens all the time, right?

      income gains to the top 1% from 2009 to 2011 were 121% of all income increases. How did that happen? Incomes to the bottom 99% fell by 0.4%

      by JesseCW on Sun Mar 31, 2013 at 06:48:54 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Would you argue that an Assistant District (0+ / 0-)

      Attorney should be negotiating for a new job with 'representatives' of a possibly criminal enterprise under investigation and consideration for prosecution by that same DA's office?

      I think a more germane argument may be that considerations given to prosecution should not be influenced by potential or pending new job offers, which are a direct conflict of interest, if not outright bribery.

      Having some knowledge about how important corporate employees are hired, I do know that these are not snap decisions.  The process typically takes months, if not over a year or more. In cases involving high government officials, even longer, since appropriate timing is often considered.

      And as we did see recently, Jack Lew had contractual arrangements with his corporate employer to receive a $1 million bonus for being selected to high government position.

      Large amounts of money awarded for moving in both directions through the revolving door pollute the honesty and morality that should attach to government actions.

      "The law is meant to be my servant and not my master, still less my torturer and my murderer." -- James Baldwin. July 11, 1966.

      by YucatanMan on Sun Mar 31, 2013 at 12:09:45 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  In either case ... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        YucatanMan, davybaby

        ... the new hire couldn't use information gained from his prosecution experience as to what the government knew/was pursuing as to specific defendants; he can only get involved in new matters for those clients, or other clients.

        I agree with your aversion to the revolving door, but there are limits to what information can go through that door.

        •  This would be true ... (0+ / 0-)
          the new hire couldn't use information gained from his prosecution experience as to what the government knew/was pursuing as to specific defendants
          if ethics and honesty were to prevail.  

          My concern, I guess, is that the sums of money involved here are so large that it becomes difficult to resist being "helpful."

          But more specifically, if a ADA was preparing to prosecute an alleged criminal and then was to meet with that criminal's representatives about accepting a lucrative job, doesn't that go directly to the integrity of whether or not to bring the prosecution to bear?  Isn't it just a half-step removed from outright bribery not to prosecute?  

          It certainly has the strong odor of bribery and unethical behavior.

          "The law is meant to be my servant and not my master, still less my torturer and my murderer." -- James Baldwin. July 11, 1966.

          by YucatanMan on Sun Mar 31, 2013 at 01:22:35 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

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