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View Diary: Exxon's Media Blackout Fails as Video Reveals Extent of Keystone Oil Spill (104 comments)

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  •  A question about the rupture flow math. (6+ / 0-)

    So at least 84,000 gallons of this dilbit has spilled, and in the Salon article linked to in the body of this diary it says that the flow capacity of the pipeline that ruptured was 95,000 gallons/day.  So by simple math, the minimum amount of time it would take a 95,000 gallons/day pipeline to leak 84,000 gallons (assuming all the flow goes out the leak) would be:
    (84000 gal / 95000 gal/day)x(24 hours/day)=21 hours!

    The spill was discovered late Friday afternoon (March 29). Now according ExxonMobil's website, it says that "Emergency response personnel were on the ground within 30 minutes after the leak was detected,...".  However, the Huffington Post reports that "Exxon said that by 3 a.m. Saturday there was no additional oil spilling from the pipeline..." Neither of these is close to the (at least) 21 hours needed from when the pipeline first ruptured to when it was turned off to allow at least 84,000 gallons to spill.

    So something doesn't add up here.  The math itself is pretty simple.  So either the (at least) 84,000 gallons spilled is wrong, or the 95,000 gallon/day capacity of the pipeline is wrong, or the pipeline was in fact leaking for at least the 21 hours calculated instead of the shorter amount of time suggested from news reports. Or was the pipeline leaking for an extended length of time before the leaked dilbit broke through the surface and was reported? And how quickly can ExxonMobil's own pipeline monitors detect a leak of this magnitude coming from one of its pipelines? Does anyone know the true numbers here, because I'm confused and concerned. Something's smells rotten here, and I don't mean just the leaked dilbit.

    But if the cause be not good, the king himself hath a heavy reckoning to make, ... there are few die well that die in a battle; ... Now, if these men do not die well, it will be a black matter for the king that led them to it; — Shakespeare, ‘Henry V’

    by dewtx on Thu Apr 04, 2013 at 02:22:30 PM PDT

    •  please excuse, dewtx, am tangled up: (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dewtx

      don't know how "new" this website is, and am creaky with my twitter skills, but there seems to be A LOT of commenting here, so dive in, join me: i'm glad i found it.

      right on your comment here, we get yanked right back to Macondo/negligence of BP ... and NEED ANSWERS !!

      i'm horribly concerned re where's POTUS ?
      -------------
      ha ha how stupid i feel.
      but here's MARKEY'S statement and i SURE NEEDED IT PRONTO !!

      bookmarked the "ranking member/dems/natres" site, and wallpapered my facebook feed ... help me out, young'uns !!

      There is no Article II power which says the Executive can violate the Constitution.--@Hugh * Addington's Perpwalk: TRAILHEAD of Accountability for Bush-2 Crimes.

      by greenbird on Thu Apr 04, 2013 at 03:17:31 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  My question was simple: (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        greenbird, AllisonInSeattle, jayden, kurt

        How much real time elasped between the moment the ExxonMobil pipeline actually ruptured and a) the time the rupture was discovered, and b) the time the pipeline was completely shutdown?

        If the size of the spill and the pipeline flow capacity values are roughly correct, then the time between rupture and shutdown had to be at least 21 hours (and probably more, since it seems unlikely that 100% of the dilbit was escaping through the rupture.) And the times that I've seen (or estimated) from media reports seems to be much less than this. And this response time seems to me to be something that would be very good to know relatively precisely in understanding this incident, as well as planning for other possible ones in the future. Also I don't know how forthcoming (or truthful) ExxonMobil would be on this particular question if asked directly.

        But if the cause be not good, the king himself hath a heavy reckoning to make, ... there are few die well that die in a battle; ... Now, if these men do not die well, it will be a black matter for the king that led them to it; — Shakespeare, ‘Henry V’

        by dewtx on Thu Apr 04, 2013 at 03:59:29 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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