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View Diary: The Ongoing War on Christianity (172 comments)

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  •  Well said (10+ / 0-)

    Although I think the political plots to  appropriate the authority of the faithfuls' pulpits goes back far, far longer than 10 years.  Is there a milestone in the struggle that influenced you to mark that time?  

    I've participated in the social justice movement among the Catholic churches and have seen a lot of good done by Christians.  It seems to me that the people (at least in this country) that come closest to living the faith, don't care that much to participate in politics.  They've found their work in front of them and are busy loving and helping people.  These aren't the ones that will be in the news or likely to come to our attention.

    I'm not liberal. I'm actually just anti-evil, OK? - Elon James White

    by Satya1 on Sun Apr 07, 2013 at 08:38:03 AM PDT

    •  It's the boiling frog.. (9+ / 0-)

      Using the pulpit and religion for political means goes back to the Borgias.

      But in the US, we have kind of had a back and forth of a multitude of messages being put forward and a standard put to the people to decide their will.

      In the last thirty years, that trend has begun to shift, and the water has slowly boiled.  

      It's happened before, when churches were used to express racism and hatred - from the Civil War through desegregation.   But after that went by the wayside, many churches went back to speaking about peace and hope.   The fire and brimstone comes out now and again, but not often.

      And there is not always something wrong with fire and brimstone - don't steal, don't harm another, etc.   But in the last thirty years, the slow drumbeat to put a level of suspicion, deception and dislike of our fellow man has come back into the pulpits.

      What makes now different is that a political party is bearing the standard of "the religious right" and "fighting for the soul.." and so on.   This message means that the religious leaders are giving up their leadership and following the lead not of the master of their faith, but of the political figures who find the issues for them.

      This abdication of practice is new; Kennedy was asked to make sure the Vatican couldn't control him.   Today, if you asked several Republicans to promise they wouldn't have a controlling role in their churches they would label you as evil.

      Gandhi's Seven Sins: Wealth without work; Pleasure without conscience; Knowledge without character; Commerce without morality; Science without humanity; Worship without sacrifice; Politics without principle

      by Chris Reeves on Sun Apr 07, 2013 at 08:47:11 AM PDT

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      •  I think the current times kicked in (3+ / 0-)
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        Onomastic, 3goldens, tampaedski

        with the Moral Majority deification of Ronnie Reagan.  But I don't have sufficient knowledge of the popular movements of Christianity and politics to know the whole story in this country.  We tend to know our own times far better than earlier generations.  But I think you've hit it that there is probably an ebb and flow of this kind of development.

        Overall, we probably first got into really big trouble when Emperor Constantine adopted the faith.  Around that era the military arm of that state went from restricting Christians from becoming soldiers to requiring soldiers to "convert" to Christianity.  It forever altered the young sect.  The peace church was infiltrated and corrupted.

        Kennedy got asked that mostly because of the fairly virulent anti-Catholic sentiment in the country.  And although he diluted it in his short term, it is still very much alive.

        Again, thanks for the great diary.

        I'm not liberal. I'm actually just anti-evil, OK? - Elon James White

        by Satya1 on Sun Apr 07, 2013 at 09:37:18 AM PDT

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