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View Diary: Perhaps this will help you understand school closings (37 comments)

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  •  The sad thing (1+ / 0-)
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    teacherken

    is that the charter schools will cost more money.  I was listening to Dick Kay on Chicago radio and they were talking about the school closings in Chicago.  

    In the 1990s I interned as a social worker on the west side of Chicago, and we were working with the community and the schools.  All the programs were defunded by changes made by Bill Clinton.  However, I saw progress, when the kids and parents were getting the needed support.  There are many things that can effect a child's learning including poverty, hunger, and problems at home that the child is helpless to resolve on their own.

    My Master thesis was based on my work.  I saw more kids get labelled with a disablity when there were problems at home that simply needed some help in order for the kids to move forward with learning.  But, once the programs were stopped, I think progress also stopped.  I truly feel that this will do nothing more than suppress groups of individuals who deserve a better chance in life.  

    I worked with some of the greatest kids with a lot of talent and I do not think the charter schools will recognize these kind of kids, but try and force them into a what they want them to be.

    "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolution­ary act. " George Orwell

    by zaka1 on Sun Apr 07, 2013 at 11:56:26 AM PDT

    •  social workers in schools are rapidly disappearing (1+ / 0-)
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      zaka1

      if you see my post earlier, we still have them in NJ schools but the groundwork is clearly being laid to oust them. Ironically, they cannot be school counselors ( formerly called guidance counselors) because they do not have any " counseling" courses ( i shit you not; the courses are titled "social work" and not "counseling "), but they can do counseling of special ed kids. it's all rather baffling.This is more about turf; for many years guidance people needed to have been teachers; once they scrapped that requirement there was no real reason to keep people with other degees from providing the services. My guess is that's what will happen eventually but not in time to save my job.

      •  My whole (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        leftangler

        education both MSW and BSW was almost all counseling and therapy classes.  We were trained as family therapists.  We also studied community psychology, did research, and took classes on politics and public policy.  We also had to pass two levels of state boards.  But, as I well know that wasn't enough education.  When the social work field was falling apart those of us seeking other jobs to support ourselves were told we weren't qualified for anything more than a sales jobs.  

        But, what your talking about is that other professions were allowed to swallow up other professions, even though, we studied through six years of college and received two degrees as social workers.  Nurses were allowed to replace social workers in the hospitals and in psych., and in the schools teachers took over.  The training in both cases is not the same, although, those replacing you thought it was the same.  It wasn't.  

        It is mind blowing.  And now the people that replaced us are being replaced by others less educated.  

        "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolution­ary act. " George Orwell

        by zaka1 on Sun Apr 07, 2013 at 12:33:40 PM PDT

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        •  you explained it in a nutshell (1+ / 0-)
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          zaka1

          tho psychologists complained we were replacing them at first, and now we are both replaced. by the way the policy makers really don't want any kind of school counseling; I have heard them say." let parents seek out counseling for kids on their own, the schools are not a social services agency" (!)and of course your classes were equivalent or better than counselors. and everyone knows it.

          •  First let me (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            leftangler

            say that I'm so sorry your job could be in jeopardy, I know what it feels like to see the system changing against all that you've been taught through the years.  And it is upsetting and rocks the very foundation one has placed under themselves.  I'm unsure if you are a social worker or teacher?  I do know that when mental health was going down many of my fellow social workers went back and got a second Master's in school social work and now I'm seeing that move will not save them either.  

            The schools are a social service mainly because they would also be mandated reporters for abuse victims.  Unless now the charter schools will no longer report these problems.  And parents can no longer afford counseling especially if they want to keep a problem private.  It use to be problems were worked out in patient/therapist confidentially and although there would documentation, work was done between parents, children, and therapists.  The only time things got reported or children were taken away was when their lives were in danger.  I never wanted to take a child away and on the rare cases where that happened it was because a child was physically and/or mentally being harmed and there was physical evidence to back up concern for the child's life.  It is a very tough call.

            My roommate was an attorney and he use to say that if they are getting rid of the social workers then we are losing our compassion as a society.  

            I wish you the best, do you know if you will be able to keep your job as these changes taking place?

            "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolution­ary act. " George Orwell

            by zaka1 on Sun Apr 07, 2013 at 02:57:53 PM PDT

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            •  I'm a social worker in the schools (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              zaka1

              but i also taught English for years before switching

            •  i will keep my job until a cost cutter (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              zaka1

              decides it is no longer needed. could be today, could be next year. could be several years. or, with weakened tenure laws, a supervisor decides my paperwork is not up to snuf ( hint; it never is, but its the only thing they count, and the one thing they can get me on, and its not for lack of effort, its just far too complicated to get it all correct ) and decides to rate me ineffective. 2 ineffectives in NJ now and you are gone. they are already targeting older, more expensive staff. yes, it happened that fast.

              •  Man, (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                leftangler

                I'm so sorry, the uncertainty is what gets to people, I think.  The paperwork was always a problem, it is never ending, I kinda use to feel like I was writing volumes and no one ever read it unless it was a state inspection or for something else.  The only time my writing seemed to be read was when my ER notes on a child abuse case went to trial.  I do wish you the best, but why isn't NASW fighting harder for social workers to maintain their jobs I'll never know.  That organization sucked up a lot money and did little for the profession.  

                I'm thinking of giving up my LCSW license this year because it is so expensive and I'm disabled now and can't see ever getting back into the field.  All that work, gone.  All the work you have done, and given of yourself, and all the work the teachers have done, just gone.  My Dad taught for years and retired in the 1990s.  I beginning to think they are finding new ways to oppress people, but that is just a crazy thought perhaps.

                "During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolution­ary act. " George Orwell

                by zaka1 on Sun Apr 07, 2013 at 06:10:30 PM PDT

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