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View Diary: Did you hear the one about the 4yo who shot the deputy's wife? But he did not shoot the deputy. (285 comments)

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  •  What "responsible gun owner" TM (27+ / 0-)

    keeps a loaded gun lying around? When I was a kid, my uncle had dozens of guns. They were either locked up in the gun safe in the closet, or he had control of them and was aware of them wherever they were. They were never loaded unless he was going to shoot something (usually a duck) or at the range.

    I note also, that in his entire 74 years of life, he never once had to shoot anyone and no one ever broke into his house.

    The very idea of casually leaving a loaded gun just lying around boggles my mind. Then to allow a four year old access to one is utterly criminal.

    Seriously? This guy was "showing off his guns" and they were loaded? What kind of idiot does that? What kind of idiot hands a loaded gun to anyone? I was taught that you remove the clip, clear the chamber and lock the slide (or equivalent) before you hand a gun to anyone. No gun is ever loaded unless I load it and I'm about to use it and it's my job to prove it. Any gun I just find lying around is presumed to be loaded until I prove to myself, the moment I pick it up, that it is not.

    No sane person just leaves loaded guns lying around. Isn't it the position of the NRA that crazy people should be prevented from owning guns?

    •  i grew up in a house with guns also (21+ / 0-)

      my uncle was a hunter, and he occasionally brought home game that my aunt would cook and serve the family.

      i am realizing for the first time, today, that i never even SAW his guns!  i have no idea where he kept them!  that's how secured they were from me and my three older cousins who also lived in the home.  there was no chance for the children to play with the guns.  They just appeared somehow when he went hunting and went back to where ever he stored them when the hunting trip was over.

      I don't remember him leaving them lying around, or even remember seeing him clean them.

      My uncle was a responsible gun owner who knew he had two teenagers and two younger children in the home.

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      by TrueBlueMajority on Tue Apr 09, 2013 at 06:27:43 AM PDT

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      •  Yup. My dad was a cop (21+ / 0-)

        I never knew where the guns were.

        He sure as shit didn't load them and show them off to people.

        Gun culture is out of control in this country and so has gun safety, apparently.

        But, how much money do you want to put down that this guy, previous to yesterday, would have described himself as a responsible gun owner?

        He just got his wife killed and ruined a little boy's life.  That is a lot of guilt to bear.  

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        by coquiero on Tue Apr 09, 2013 at 06:59:42 AM PDT

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        •  I had not thought about this for a long time... (10+ / 0-)

          From about age 8 to 12 I had a stepfather who operated a couple of liquor stores. Both did a lot of cash business and he would leave work each day with a cash box that usually had at least $1000 in it. He had a permit to carry a pistol, and this was in the late ‘70s when you had to prove to the county sheriff that you had a damned good reason to want to carry a gun to get a permit.

          Anyway, when he got home each day he would put the cash box and the revolver, a snub nose .38, on the kitchen counter. After dinner he would “hide” both of them in the oven. Well, one night someone broke into the house and stole both the cash and the gun. We were all asleep upstairs. If the burglars weren’t armed when they came in; they were when they left. Nice to think that stepdad would have provided the gun to kill us with had those people chosen to do so.

          As a child, I was also well aware of the dresser drawer where yet more pistols were stored. I can still picture them quite well: a 9mm Beretta and a frickin’ ginormous nickel-plated .45 Magnum revolver – your classic Dirty Harry piece. I don’t know if they still teach firearm safety and marksmanship in the Boy Scouts, but that’s where I learned, which may have helped keep me out of trouble with the guns. Nonetheless, interesting to think back to what a reckless idiot my stepfather was with guns.

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          by Joe Bob on Tue Apr 09, 2013 at 09:05:28 AM PDT

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          •  BSA still teaches merit badges for (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            TrueBlueMajority

            Archery, rifle shooting & shotgun shooting.  There is no merit badge for hand guns or semi-automatic weapons.  

            Interesting side note is that the Eagle required safety merit badge seems to have no mention of gun safety in the home, although it does ask the scouts to make a list of things they can do to make their home and family safer.

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            by Ricochet67 on Tue Apr 09, 2013 at 10:49:55 AM PDT

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    •  That is how I thought people treated guns before (0+ / 0-)

      12/14. Since that time I have learned, they treat guns exactly like they treat their video games. Very very sloppy.

      guns are fun v. hey buddy, watch what you are doing -- which side are you on?

      by 88kathy on Tue Apr 09, 2013 at 10:36:35 AM PDT

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