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View Diary: How Airliners Work - Flaps and Slats (77 comments)

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  •  Arguably (6+ / 0-)

    The L1011 was the better plane, but Douglas rushed the DC-10 into production to beat Lockheed to market.

    They used to say the ultimate airliner would be designed by Lockheed, built by Boeing and marketed by Douglas.

    If the pilot's good, see, I mean if he's reeeally sharp, he can barrel that baby in so low... oh you oughta see it sometime. It's a sight. A big plane like a '52... varrrooom! Its jet exhaust... frying chickens in the barnyard!

    by Major Kong on Fri Apr 19, 2013 at 06:35:23 PM PDT

    [ Parent ]

    •  Have you read "Destination: Disaster"? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      RiveroftheWest

      In large part about the L1011 v DC10 competition -- as well as the subsequent Turkish Airlines DC10 crash.

      Very compelling read, and excellently researched.

      •  "...Disaster..." (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        RiveroftheWest

        Didn't that also say that as a result of the competition they got away with not using disc brakes to lock the forward flaps in place which is what caused the asymmetry when the engine departure destroyed the hydraulics in the Chicago crash?  After reading this or something very similar, I refused to fly in that plane because there were so many design flaws or cut corners.  

    •  I have always has a bad expierence flying in (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      RiveroftheWest

      the L1011.
      Conestoga Wagon of the skies.
      Very rough, lots of up and down bouncing.

      We had to take one out of Tampa to Atlanta because the regular plane was broken.

      They (Delta) rolled out the L1011 that was supposed to be retired in 4 months.
      There were coke and coffee stains on the ceiling and the ride through clear air turbulence over N. Florida was scarey to say the least.

      Flying over the Rockies going into Stapleton in Denver was also not ever on my bucket list.

      Maybe I just was never on the better flights. Lots of wing flex though. :-0

      "People who see a contradiction between science and the bible don't really understand either." PvtJarHead

      by Tinfoil Hat on Sat Apr 20, 2013 at 04:23:00 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I didn't realize that.... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      RiveroftheWest

      I worked for Douglas in Long Beach in 67 when the 10's were in full production.  I had a job in the Major Subcontract stockroom, where we received, inventoried and disbursed flight computers, engines, struts and wheels and a lot of other big stuff from outside vendors.  Of course, at 19, I had no idea about the business decisions driving stuff, but there was always pressure to get ships off the line....something about being paid.

      Finding Fred A Memoir of Discovery @ smashwords.com/iTunes

      by Timothy L Smith on Sat Apr 20, 2013 at 10:59:35 AM PDT

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      •  We still have DC-10s in the freight world (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        RiveroftheWest

        I don't fly them but I usually jumpseat on one when I'm going to work.

        There are still some MD-11s flying passengers. I think KLM has some. It's basically a larger, more modern version of a DC-10. They never really caught with the passenger haulers but we like them for freight.

        If the pilot's good, see, I mean if he's reeeally sharp, he can barrel that baby in so low... oh you oughta see it sometime. It's a sight. A big plane like a '52... varrrooom! Its jet exhaust... frying chickens in the barnyard!

        by Major Kong on Sat Apr 20, 2013 at 11:20:44 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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