Skip to main content

View Diary: Biggest Blunders in Technology History (76 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  Number 3 is good (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    commonmass, Troubadour, alain2112

    the others are rather baffling for inclusion on this list . . .

    •  To elaborate (6+ / 0-)

      nuclear fission is by far the safest/cleanest way by which mankind has ever generated electricity.

      To replace that, I'd go with Edison bullying Tesla over ways to distribute electricity to the masses.

      And to stay on the bullying theme - how about that thug Bill Gates?  Don't even get me started on how he's held technology back!!

      And how about VHS winning out over beta?

      And cassettes over 8-track? WTF was up with that??

      And finally, foamy hand soap?  Give me one good reason that wasn't invented 100 years ago???

      •  I disagree on nuclear. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Roadbed Guy

        As a total system, including the extraction of the rare heavy metals and disposal of waste, and including the precarious active-loop safety measures, it's not even close to being clean or safe.  It's just cleaner and safer than fossil fuels, but more dramatic when it goes wrong.

        To replace that, I'd go with Edison bullying Tesla over ways to distribute electricity to the masses.
        Lines vs. induction?  I don't know why one would consider lines to be a "blunder".  The potential of induction hasn't been explored enough to say that it should have been the answer.
        And to stay on the bullying theme - how about that thug Bill Gates?  Don't even get me started on how he's held technology back!!
        Futilely, as it turns out, so doesn't rise to the level of an historic blunder.  Google simply sidestepped him and Microsoft is now a junior partner in the future of tech.
        And how about VHS winning out over beta?
        I see no basis for calling that a blunder.  They made a tradespace decision between the characteristics of two formats, and traded some quality for cheaper manufacturing.  That's just the kind of tradeoff that always happens in tech, and that's why most computers aren't Alienware.
        And finally, foamy hand soap?  Give me one good reason that wasn't invented 100 years ago???
        It's a Byzantine innovation based on ultra-granular appreciation of a material - it changes nothing fundamentally.  In other words, the reason is that 100 years ago people were more interested in finding soaps that actually work and didn't poison people.  Only later did they start caring about fine details like texture and microstructure.

        Democracy is a habit, not a circumstance.

        by Troubadour on Mon Apr 22, 2013 at 08:39:12 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Foamy hand soap (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Roadbed Guy, Troubadour

        Is one of those "natural" inventions that has been around for millennia, rediscovered/reinvented and then used/discarded/dennied by countless generations of pubescent lads.

        So the real question is: why did it take mankind more than 10,000 years to figure out you could bottle the stuff, slap on a colorful label and sell it for a huge profit?

        What about my Daughter's future?

        by koNko on Tue Apr 23, 2013 at 04:30:47 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Well, it didn't reach my neck of the woods (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Troubadour, koNko

          until relatively recently.

          And what I'm talking about is the soap that you pour into the bottle and it looks like regular liquid soap.

          But somehow when it comes out, it has magically been transformed into foam.

          I've been thinking long and hard about this overnight, and now think that the magic must be in the nozzle/pumping mechanism - and not necessarily the soap itself.  So that should have been the technological advance I alluded to, not necessarily the soap itself.

          •  Actually, it is in the pumping action (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Roadbed Guy, Troubadour

            Which vents air through a tube at the return valve.

            Some Japanese brands like KAO make incredibly small bubbles, it's like 10% soap.

            Take one to the hospital and use the MRI to make a tomograph, it will only cost you about $5000.

            What about my Daughter's future?

            by koNko on Tue Apr 23, 2013 at 09:50:12 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site