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View Diary: Black Kos, Tuesday's Chile (148 comments)

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  •  Happy Tuesday, and thanks (7+ / 0-)

    for yet another great issue of BK.

    The world watched the Freedom Riders of '61 and the hatemongering KKK and its supporters. I was 17, a high school senior in Canada, watching news of the Freedom Riders with hope and admiration, and the hatemongers with horror and fear. I wished for the courage and means to be there, but had neither. Janie McKinney is my hero, along with the Freedom Riders.

    “We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors; we borrow it from our children” ― Chief Seattle

    by SoCalSal on Tue May 07, 2013 at 02:51:28 PM PDT

    •  CBC news coverage of Freedom Riders (5+ / 0-)

      Join us on the Black Kos front porch to review news and views written from a black pov—everyone is welcome.

      by Denise Oliver Velez on Tue May 07, 2013 at 03:06:00 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Oh thank you for that! (4+ / 0-)

        That CBC segment sanitized the violence of those times. I do recall the images of violence, stills and video. Most of the news coverage is good in that lengthy clip, including an inspiring interview with MLK who referred to "the rolling tide of world opinion" in favor of equal rights.

        “We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors; we borrow it from our children” ― Chief Seattle

        by SoCalSal on Tue May 07, 2013 at 03:40:40 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  They covered the Nazi "Hate Bus" (5+ / 0-)

          in that clip

           photo RockwellHateBus_zpsff044543.jpg

          Here's more background:

          http://www.historybyzim.com/...

           
          A bit of background behind this photo. George Lincoln Rockwell was the founder of the American Nazi Party and a Holocaust denier. Additionally, he was a white supremacist and thus against the Civil Rights Movements. When the Freedom Riders began their journey to desegregate the Deep South’s bus stations, Rockwell bought a Volkswagen van and turned it into a “Hate Bus” by plastering swastikas and pro-white slogans all over it. They drove it around the Deep South, putting on rallies and speaking engagements with the Ku Klux Klan. The photo above was taken on May 23rd, three days after the Freedom Riders were assaulted at the Greyhound Bus Station in Montgomery.

          While Rockwell was for racial segregation and believed other races to be inferior, he wanted to form associations with the Nation of Islam. He believed religious leader Elijah Muhammad was the “black people’s Hitler.” Rockwell also admired Malcolm X and believed he (Malcolm X) was the true leader of Black America. Malcolm X did not feel admiration in the slightest for Rockwell. In 1965, while Rockwell was on another “Hate Bus” campaign in the South, Malcolm X sent him the following telegram:

            This is to warn you that I am no longer held in check from fighting white supremacists by Elijah Muhammad’s separatist Black Muslim movement, and that if your present racist agitation against our people there in Alabama causes physical harm to Reverend King or any other black Americans who are only attempting to enjoy their rights as free human beings, that you and your Ku Klux Klan friends will be met with maximum physical retaliation from those of us who are not hand-cuffed by the disarming philosophy of nonviolence, and who believe in asserting our right of self-defense – by any means necessary.

          Join us on the Black Kos front porch to review news and views written from a black pov—everyone is welcome.

          by Denise Oliver Velez on Tue May 07, 2013 at 03:47:30 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Yes, another part of the ugly history. (4+ / 0-)

            What did you think of the cbc coverage?

            “We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors; we borrow it from our children” ― Chief Seattle

            by SoCalSal on Tue May 07, 2013 at 04:10:32 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  For that time period (4+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              nomandates, a2nite, SoCalSal, Lorinda Pike

              it was actually better than much of what was on the airwaves here in the States.  No 20 second sound bites.  

              It was certainly not sympathetic towards the racists they interviewed.

              Join us on the Black Kos front porch to review news and views written from a black pov—everyone is welcome.

              by Denise Oliver Velez on Tue May 07, 2013 at 04:28:27 PM PDT

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              •  No, not sympathetic towards racists. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Denise Oliver Velez

                One of the CBC newscasters said something in that clip to the effect that the equal rights movement was driven by a few black leaders and students, and most blacks were apathetic about the movement. That "apathetic" bit got an eyebrow raise from me, not an accurate descriptor then or now for anyone. IMO. Otherwise, I thought the Canadian coverage was good; a bit stodgy compared to American news programs, but reliable overall.

                “We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors; we borrow it from our children” ― Chief Seattle

                by SoCalSal on Tue May 07, 2013 at 05:34:24 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  actually - I think Martin Luther King Jr. (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  SoCalSal

                  agreed with that in the interview - would have to go back and listen again.

                  I don't expect much analysis to make sense in a 1961 broadcast.

                  The movement was driven at that time by radical students and a few outspoken preachers.  There were a passle of black churchmen who didn't want to "rock the boat".

                  I don't think apathetic was the right word - but there were black folks who didn't want activists stirring up the pot, and some people who were just bludgeoned into passivity.  

                  Many of the freedom riders had their differences with Dr. King (since he was trying to stop them)

                  Heck - the SCLC forced John Lewis to re-write his March on Washington speech.  It was "too militant"

                  Join us on the Black Kos front porch to review news and views written from a black pov—everyone is welcome.

                  by Denise Oliver Velez on Tue May 07, 2013 at 06:01:17 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  The passivity was out of my view (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    Denise Oliver Velez
                    ...and some people who were just bludgeoned into passivity.  
                    I thought that everyone was passionate about the movement, whether they wanted something more, something less, or something different.

                    But I was watching from afar. And I'm still learning.

                    “We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors; we borrow it from our children” ― Chief Seattle

                    by SoCalSal on Tue May 07, 2013 at 07:38:53 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

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