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View Diary: Overnight News Digest: Climate Change Edition (31 comments)

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  •  I totally agree Gooserock. (11+ / 0-)

    I don't have any memory of when health care became a big business.

    The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it.― Neil deGrasse Tyson

    by maggiejean on Mon May 20, 2013 at 09:08:13 PM PDT

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    •  Around the time that specialties were (5+ / 0-)

      formalized, IMHO.

      Then, made worse when HMOs came out.

      "So, please stay where you are. Don't move and don't panic. Don't take off your shoes! Jobs is on the way."

      by wader on Mon May 20, 2013 at 09:19:44 PM PDT

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      •  Specialties have been around (6+ / 0-)

        for as long as I've been in health care (and that is a very long time) but for profit health care is newer than that. I think you have something with HMO's though.

        The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it.― Neil deGrasse Tyson

        by maggiejean on Mon May 20, 2013 at 09:23:23 PM PDT

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        •  I think you're right. (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          wader, maggiejean

          I was working for Hennepin County in Minneapolis in the mid- late-70s, during which time the county signed on to something called Physicians' Health Care, which was, I believe, the first HMO to offer services in the Twin Cities.  Before that, our health insurance plan allowed us to seek treatment at any hospital, clinic, or medical practice within the state of Minnesota.  Suddenly, we were given a handbook with a list of hospitals and medical practices that were "approved."  It was a substantial list, to be sure, but some were very upset when they discovered the doctors they had been using for years were not among those approved by PHP.  People were upset.  However, in hindsight, the plan was very, very, good.  A prescription cost a flat $1.50 to fill and a doctor's appointment was $9 a pop.  And BTW, employees only paid $38 for full coverage of themselves and $20 for any additional family member.  So how good was it?  One of my co-workers had to have an emergency coronary bypass.  Everything, totaling something like $45,000, was covered except for a $120 ambulance fee.  This was in 1978 or so, I think.  It was great; it was also the beginning of the end, I think.  

          -7.13 / -6.97 "The people never give up their liberties but under some delusion." -- Edmund Burke

          by GulfExpat on Tue May 21, 2013 at 02:35:29 AM PDT

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