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View Diary: Dawn Chorus: Meet the locals! (84 comments)

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  •  It's good that the populations are being (18+ / 0-)

    scattered around a bit. It gives me hope that they might make it after all, since they'll be less vulnerable to one disaster (including local NRA crazies) taking them all out. When the Big Sur fire went through a few years back and chicks survived in the wild nests, that was a great milestone. It showed that those adults actually knew how to pick a good nest site that would protect the offspring. Every little bit helps.

    •  Do you know (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Kestrel, lineatus, tgypsy, matching mole

      what the current approximate population is? I seem to remember there was a point when it was under 20.

      It's almost miraculous to me that they are still around, though I realize that miracle is the result of a lot of hard work by humans. Also I imagine they are very vulnerable due to lack of genetic diversity, as would be the case with any species entirely descended from a very few individuals.

      "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself."........ "The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little." (yeah, same guy.)

      by sidnora on Mon May 27, 2013 at 05:17:22 AM PDT

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      •  Lots of info the Ventana Wildlife Society: (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        tgypsy, sidnora

        http://www.ventanaws.org/...

        They say 200 living in the wild now; 50 in Pinnacles and Big Sur.  The website even has a tool that lets you identify birds you've seen by their tag numbers.  

      •  The global population was down to about 30 birds (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        sidnora

        at its lowest point back in the 1980s. Loss of genetic diversity would have occurred.  Since then breeding of captive birds is carefully controlled in an attempt to minimize any further of loss of genetic diversity.

        Interestingly Andean Condors have very low genetic diversity despite still being widespread in the Andes.

        Some species don't seem to show any ill effects from population bottlenecks (i.e. crashing down to a very small size, even if only for a short time) such as the Nene while others have genetic problems (e.g. Florida Panther).

        "To see both sides of a quarrel, is to judge without hate or alarm" - Richard Thompson

        by matching mole on Mon May 27, 2013 at 07:16:03 PM PDT

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        •  Interesting. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          matching mole

          We have seen both Andean Condors (in captivity)and nenes (in the wild). AFAIK,  the nenes are the rarest bird we've seen, with a global population of about 1000, though I remember them telling us when we were there that it was only about 300. I think they're nursing them back from the brink, like the condors.

          "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself."........ "The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little." (yeah, same guy.)

          by sidnora on Mon May 27, 2013 at 07:38:09 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

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