Skip to main content

View Diary: e-books: what's going on in the digital format (34 comments)

Comment Preferences

  •  You don't get 10-15% of (6+ / 0-)

    the $25 cover price. You get 10-15% of the price the bookstore pays the publisher.  (Well, less another 15-20% to your agent.) But of course that still can produce far greater income than 70% of a $10 self-published ebook! If you're lucky.

    Great diary. V. interesting. My personal prediction of the impact of King's publishing choice on the industry is that it will result in this:

    "Gussie, a glutton for punishment, stared at himself in the mirror."

    by GussieFN on Wed May 22, 2013 at 11:11:56 AM PDT

    •  Oh, also: (3+ / 0-)

      I've been kinda considering releasing an old unsold book of mine as an ebook, mostly to see how the whole thing works.

      Any suggestions as to best how-to sites/books explaining the process?

      "Gussie, a glutton for punishment, stared at himself in the mirror."

      by GussieFN on Wed May 22, 2013 at 11:25:21 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Umm, not really (5+ / 0-)

      8-10% MSRP for paperback
      12-15% MSRP for hardcover

      These are pretty standard.

      And pay an agent? Screw that!

      •  You don't have an agent? (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Susan from 29, Youffraita

        (And I'm embarrassed I got that wrong. I'm really getting the same royalty whether a book sells for full price at the local bookstore or at 30% off at Amazon? I need to read my contracts more closely.)

        "Gussie, a glutton for punishment, stared at himself in the mirror."

        by GussieFN on Wed May 22, 2013 at 12:13:33 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  (Which, obviously, is why (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Susan from 29, Youffraita

          I need an agent.)

          "Gussie, a glutton for punishment, stared at himself in the mirror."

          by GussieFN on Wed May 22, 2013 at 12:14:30 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Why would I at this point? (6+ / 0-)

          I know more about the book market than most of them, and I'm perfectly adept at screaming at someone without interference...

          •  I dunno. All the contractual (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Susan from 29, Youffraita

            shit? Negotiation of theme park rights?  

            I guess it's different once you're a name. and aren't submitting to editors who  have no clue who you are.

            "Gussie, a glutton for punishment, stared at himself in the mirror."

            by GussieFN on Wed May 22, 2013 at 12:21:26 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Most agents aren't literary attorneys (5+ / 0-)

              If you want to put some curl into your hair, hie thee to Kristine Kathryn Rusch's blog - her Business Rusch articles go into detail about the many, many ways to screw over an author via agent.

              How does the Republican Congress sit down with all the butthurt over taxing the wealthy?

              by athenap on Wed May 22, 2013 at 01:59:31 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Well, clearly I'm a complete contractual (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Susan from 29

                idiot, I think I've proved that in this diary, and I don't have the chops of certain other authors in this thread, but I've been making a meagre living doing this for about fifteen years, and I've had a hand in 14 books published, most of them with the Gargantuan International Publishers, a few with smaller ones, and I only read one Rusch article, where she recommends a lawyer instead of an agent, and it's nonsense. Something about contractually giving the publisher the right to prevent the writer from publishing anything else until the book-under-this-contract was published? And even shadier rights that writers signs away. Doesn't happen, at least not in my experience. No reputable publisher in the world would try to enforce anything like that. They'd take a tremendous reputational hit for even bringing it up. That article is actually an argument for an agent over an attorney; attorneys are paid to watch out for all that letter-of-the-law shit. An agent knows the business.

                All that said, I can't think off the top of my head of a diary in which I've more completely embarrassed myself, so ...

                "Gussie, a glutton for punishment, stared at himself in the mirror."

                by GussieFN on Wed May 22, 2013 at 04:57:16 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Ah, but you have taught those of us who know (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  GussieFN

                  even less a lot.

                  All that said, I can't think off the top of my head of a diary in which I've more completely embarrassed myself, so ...
                •  Maybe you're in a different area of publishing (0+ / 0-)

                  but the stuff she talks about is boilerplate in almost every one of the reputable publishers in my area of publishing. The right of first refusal is one that's traditionally outlined as broadly as possible (for the publisher's benefit) and either excised altogether or sliced down to as specific as possible (to keep the author from becoming an indentured servant) but it is indeed in there. I don't know a single big house that didn't at least try, if not insist.

                  These days, they are sliding in non-compete clauses to prevent authors from self-pubbing side stories the publisher isn't even interested in.

                  This stuff is happening. And it's nothing new under the sun. Yes, agents knew the business, but in the past two or three years, the business has changed so much that there are a lot of agents who are just as in the dark about publishing's changing face as average people on the street.

                  I'm sincerely glad it hasn't happened to you, and I hope that when you review your contracts, you don't find any unpleasant surprises.

                  And honestly, please don't be embarrassed. Authors have traditionally been "mushroomed" in terms of the business end of things. Contracts are all individually tailored, even from book to book, and nobody knows every "gentlemen's agreement" standard that gets the handshake at conferences, lunches, or meetings. We all make the publishing world a better place when we talk to each other. And remind each other that what we do has value (and we deserve to be paid for our efforts).

                  If Rusch's articles aren't to your taste (or her hubby and fellow writer Dean Wesley Smith's blog--which includes a lot of neat freebie fics, too!), AC Crispin maintains the Writer Beware blog.

                  How does the Republican Congress sit down with all the butthurt over taxing the wealthy?

                  by athenap on Fri May 24, 2013 at 06:28:12 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

        •  Based off US cover price, (3+ / 0-)

          according to my most recent. How mortifying. I want to claim I got confused about book club and audio rights, but no: I'm just a fuckwit. I've been getting this wrong for twelve years.

          "Gussie, a glutton for punishment, stared at himself in the mirror."

          by GussieFN on Wed May 22, 2013 at 12:19:19 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  It depends on your contract (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Susan from 29, Youffraita

      But most pre-ebook contracts did, in fact, base the royalty cut off the cover price, at least in the large publishers for paperbacks. Bookstores bought on consignment at 60% discount and what they didn't sell, they remaindered/returned for credit with the distributor.

      And authors wouldn't get any royalties until they earned out their advance after the reserve against returns.

      How does the Republican Congress sit down with all the butthurt over taxing the wealthy?

      by athenap on Wed May 22, 2013 at 01:47:50 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site