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View Diary: You are on Indian Land. (131 comments)

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  •  one small quibble (10+ / 0-)

    "that the streets of this city cannot be un-asphalted" -- actually I'm not sure this is true. From what I see, the life-forces of living plants keep working as hard as they know how to push up through the asphalt, and if left alone, the plants (and their helpers, little critters of all varieties) will win. The only way the asphalt wins is because they (we) keep repaving it.

    One of the side effects of austerity and sequester and all that could be that the government abandons large sections of concrete and asphalt (in Detroit, for example), and allows it to turn back into prairie or woodland or whatever the soil underneath wants to be.

    I am descended from people who came here from Europe between 1630 (mother's side) and 1911 (father's side). We have lived here long enough that I would not be at home anywhere else. But I am ashamed of what we -- my people -- have done to this land, and grateful to the First Nations people taking leadership to say "This must stop, this is not acceptable."

    •  Nice. (10+ / 0-)
      One of the side effects of austerity and sequester and all that could be that the government abandons large sections of concrete and asphalt (in Detroit, for example), and allows it to turn back into prairie or woodland or whatever the soil underneath wants to be.
      That is an excellent idea. Or tear out the concrete and put in community gardens, or native prairie. Small things like that do have ripple effects. As I've said elsewhere: If you've changed one small corner of one city street, you have changed the world.

      I guess part of the point 88Kathy was making was that not all First Nations/American Indians/indigenous people have conducted themselves in respectable fashion and have certainly participated in some forms of desecration themselves.

      Access to the Little Cedar Spirit tree had to be restricted due to vandalism/littering (beer cans and such). Knowing what we do about the location's remoteness and what we do about the chronic post-traumatic effects of colonialism, it's probably safe to assume that at least some of the offenders were tribal members.

      That's what colonialism does.

      I am also mixed race, but since I was born and raised here, ALL of my ancestors are here on Indian Land.

      The implication I am trying to make is that it's about thinking in terms of respecting ancestors--all of them--and if you start thinking in those terms, I think is impacts your way of going about your business--no matter who you are.

      •  Unfortunately slobs will be slobs (0+ / 0-)

        and no one's ancestors are free of slobs.

        "Don't be a slob" is learned behavior - and it's way past time we ALL started learning it and teaching it. (I try really hard not to be one, but admit I'm not perfect. Sigh.)

        If it's
        Not your body,
        Then it's
        Not your choice
        And it's
        None of your damn business!

        by TheOtherMaven on Thu May 23, 2013 at 09:24:45 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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