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View Diary: Lauryn Hill Begins 3-Month Sentence for Tax Evasion. Number of Wall St. Executives in Jail? Zero. (80 comments)

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  •  I agree with the diarist (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    johnny wurster, sviscusi, TooFolkGR

    Since in fact Wall Street was not prosecuted as extensively as our sense of justice demands, the US should stop enforcing all laws.

    I am certain that is the point, not a calculated emotional button fast-track to the rec list.

    •  You know Kos' rule of not being a dick (10+ / 0-)

      in someone else's diary?

      I'd appreciate it if you not falsify my claims and distort the diary.

      Of course, if you can point out where I stated that Hill should not have been prosecuted, and that the conclusion is that the US should stop enforcing all laws, I'll gladly retract.

      Otherwise, consider this an invitation to the door. Respectfully.

      "If the Jew who struggles for justice for Palestine is considered anti-Semitic, & if Palestinians seeking self-determination are so accused...then no oppositional move can take place w/o risking the accusation." - Judith Butler

      by David Harris Gershon on Thu Jul 11, 2013 at 07:13:46 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Thats not the diarist point at all (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Lost and Found, 2thanks, 4kedtongue

      How about the US should start enforcing all laws equally? Instead of not at all.

      As in prosecute Wall Street AND Hill. Prosecute Snowden AND Dick Cheney. Etc etc.

      •  diarist needs to point out what (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        johnny wurster, FG, Balto, Quicklund

        the banksters did that was illegal and they could be prosecuted on.
        Unethical behavior is not always illegal. sadly.

        •  Seriously? (6+ / 0-)

          Nothing illegal? Auto-signing thousands of mortages a day that were supposed to be reviewed in person? Faulty loans, fraudulent foreclosures.

          I swear in the past two days Ive seen people defending John Yoo and now saying that banksters did only 'unethical' not illegal things? I feel like I woke up in some alternate universe.

          Money laundering by large international banks has reached epidemic proportions, and U.S. authorities are supposedly looking into Citigroup and JPMorgan Chase & Co. Gov. Jerome Powell, on behalf of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, recently testified to Congress on the issue. International criminals needn’t worry. Complicit bankers have nothing to fear from the U.S. justice system.

          There may be fines, but the largest financial companies are unlikely to face criminal actions or meaningful sanctions. The Department of Justice has decided that these banks are too big to prosecute to the full extent of the law, though why this also gets employees and executives off the hook remains a mystery. And the Federal Reserve refuses to rescind bank licenses, undermining the credibility and stability of the financial system.

          http://thegazette.com/...
          At a recent congressional hearing, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., asked what it would take for a company to lose its U.S. banking license. Powell replied that pulling a bank’s license may be “appropriate when there’s a criminal conviction.”

          I have not found any cases of the Fed ordering the termination of banking activities in the U.S. for a foreign bank after a criminal conviction for money laundering. Nor has the Fed taken action to shut down a bank that signed a deferred prosecution agreement.

          If you or I tried to launder money, we would probably go to jail. But when the employees of a very big bank do so, there are no meaningful consequences.

          This diary is just saying what Warren has said many times. And people are defending banks here? wtf.
      •  The one has no bearing on the other (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        TooFolkGR

        but let's mention it anyway because it's sure to generate an emotional response.

        Apologies were offered for Ms Hill. "She already paid back the money but she's still facing prison!". [paraphrase] That does not sound to me like the diarist thinks the law should be enforced.

        It comes down to the fact we all know from childhood that two wrongs don't make a right. The gov't fucked up on Wall Street? OK ... that has nothing to do with crimes committed later by Ms Hill ... or anyone else.

        •  I dont disagree that Hill (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          burlydee, Quicklund

          shouldnt face punishment, just that the argument that enforcement is selective is quite valid as most any evidence would seem to show.

          As for the

          but let's mention it anyway because it's sure to generate an emotional response.
          It is relevant to this issue regardless of what you think. Selective enforcement of leaks and punishment of leakers. It all points two a two-tiered Justice system.

          And anways, whats the probem  my opinion even if as you claim for whatever reason it was 'meant to get an emotional  response'.  Is that not why you post in general?

          I express myself the way I express myself
          As did I.
          •  I know on no one on this site (0+ / 0-)

            Who is against greater regulation and fewer loopholes for Wall Street.

            That has nothing to do with Ms Hill.

            And anways, whats the probem  my opinion even if as you claim for whatever reason it was 'meant to get an emotional  response'.  Is that not why you post in general?
            That was not directed at you. But since you asked, no, I do not think the hallmark of good writing is the pressing of emotional buttons. That is the hallmark of most Tea Party rhetoric after all.
            As did I. [express yourself as yourself]
            I would certainly hope so and I urge you to always do so. Not that you need my urging.
        •  Uh, yes, it does. If they are going to jail Hill (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          aliasalias

          for a lesser crime, they should jail the WS banksters commensurately longer for their far greater crimes.

          Sorry, but these white collar crooks are not too big to jail anymore than their crooked companies are too big to fail.

          Information is the currency of democracy. ~Thomas Jefferson

          by CIndyCasella on Thu Jul 11, 2013 at 08:26:48 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  DHG has 3, count 'em, 3 diaries on the rec list. (0+ / 0-)

      Your comments rally us around DHG.

      Your mission is not accomplished, quite the contrary.

      Information is the currency of democracy. ~Thomas Jefferson

      by CIndyCasella on Thu Jul 11, 2013 at 08:17:37 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Actually, the distinction is (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      NYFM, TooFolkGR, Quicklund

      that prosecution tax evasion is easy, and nobody knows what laws the "Wall Street Execs" broke, much less how to prove them.

      "We're now in one of those periods when the reality of intense pressure on the middle class diverges from long-held assumptions of how the American bargain should work" --James Fallows

      by Inland on Thu Jul 11, 2013 at 09:37:51 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Nobody knows WHAT?!? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        aliasalias

        The Attorney General for the State of New York seems to have a pretty good idea.  As does Elliot Spitzer.  Not to mention countless Due Diligence Underwriter whistleblowers who have come forward to expose massive FRAUD that extends all the way to the top.

        That's a lot of nobodies.

        all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.

        by 4kedtongue on Thu Jul 11, 2013 at 10:55:52 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  OUR sense? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      aliasalias
      Since in fact Wall Street was not prosecuted as extensively as our sense of justice demands, the US should stop enforcing all laws.
      This is what Lanny Breuer had to say regarding his dogged pursuit of justice wrt Wall Street chicanery.  

      http://www.pbs.org/...

      LANNY BREUER: The jobs of tens of thousands of employees can literally be at stake.

      NARRATOR: In a September 2012 speech, Lanny Breuer gave a speech explaining his reluctance to indict a major bank.

      LANNY BREUER: — the kinds of considerations in white collar cases that literally keep me up at night.

      MARTIN SMITH: You gave a speech before the New York Bar Association. And in that speech, you made a reference to losing sleep at night, worrying about what a lawsuit might result in at a large financial institution.

      LANNY BREUER: Right.

      MARTIN SMITH: Is that really the job of a prosecutor, to worry about anything other than simply pursuing justice?

      LANNY BREUER: Well, I think I am pursuing justice. And I think the entire responsibility of the department is to pursue justice. But in any given case, I think I and prosecutors around the country, being responsible, should speak to regulators, should speak to experts, because if I bring a case against institution A, and as a result of bringing that case, there’s some huge economic effect — if it creates a ripple effect so that suddenly, counterparties and other financial institutions or other companies that had nothing to do with this are affected badly — it’s a factor we need to know and understand.

      SEN. TED KAUFMAN: That was very disturbing to me, very disturbing. That was never raised at any time during any of our discussions. That is not the job of a prosecutor, to worry about the health of the banks, in my opinion. Job of the prosecutors is to prosecute criminal behavior. It’s not to lie awake at night and kind of decide the future of the banks.

      I am certain that is the point, not a calculated emotional button fast-track to the rec list.
      I share Sen. Kaufman's sense of just how extensively the Obama DoJ has pursued Justice on Wall Street.  How about you?

      all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.

      by 4kedtongue on Thu Jul 11, 2013 at 10:49:27 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  And (0+ / 0-)

        Here I thought mentioning it is DK consensus opinion that Wall Street was under-punished would be one thing no one would disagree with.

        I so under-estimated DK.

        •  C'mon Quiclund... (0+ / 0-)

          ...I think you know what part of your comment I was addressing.

          Of course you know what the consensus is here regarding the zeal with which the DoJ has pursued the higher ranking executives on Wall Street.  Your comment was a low blow.  The diarist was pointing out a double standard wrt who gets prosecuted and who doesn't, NOT that the US should stop enforcing all laws because of that double standard.

          It's one thing to make it about the diarist and those who support the diary's main argument.  It's another to double down when called out on it.

          You can and have done so much better when you disagree with the premise of a diary.  I hope I'm not over-estimating your ability to make an argument worthy of a respectful reply.  Kindly cut the shit.

          :)

          all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.

          by 4kedtongue on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 08:41:25 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Since I acknowledged the prosecution has not been (0+ / 0-)

            as severe as anyone here would like, I do not see what your point is. You seem to be hung up on the phrasing of my original comment, which spoke of the consensus DK opinion.

            Is that your objection, that I call opinion opinion and not axiomatic fact?

            •  Anyone here would like... (0+ / 0-)

              ...including you?  It was a compound sentence, after all.  What came after your acknowledgement was more than a misreading of the diarist's intended argument.  

              Since A, then B.  

              A
              Since in fact Wall Street was not prosecuted as extensively as our sense of justice demands,
              Then
              B
              the US should stop enforcing all laws.
              Is this what you actually believe the diarist is saying?  Or is this your way of distancing yourself from the DKos consensus regarding the lack of will of the DoJ to prosecute Wall Street execs?

              You see, your acknowledgement in the first part of the sentence takes on a sarcasm in the latter part of the sentence.  It's a little word game...and it's easy enough to recognize it for what it is.

              all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.

              by 4kedtongue on Fri Jul 12, 2013 at 09:00:38 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

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