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View Diary: What's Happenin'? ☮ ♥ ☺8.22.13 (51 comments)

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  •  I think the issue is the documents (8+ / 0-)

    It sounds like the British government got access to documents from Miranda's devices.

    They may have been some of the NSA documents.

    One of the legal efforts is an attempt to block their ability to read the documents.

    We only know some of what is going on.

    *
    Here is a strange thought:

    Could this have been a way to trap the British and Americans into an over reaction?

    When I was at Berkeley during the student activism (my time 1965-1667) whatever the demonstrators did, the administration was sure to do something even dumber and the saga continued.

    We know that whatever documents they have, they are stored several places in the world.

    So what ever documents were recovered from Miranda were copies, not the originals.

    The detention was a perfect time to write the story about the destruction of hard drives by the Guardian.

    In any case, the detention show that they overplayed their hand in the detention

    But then again, maybe they don't care because they are scarred shitless about the actual set of documents that Snowden provided.

    •  thanks, here's more (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      allenjo, StrayCat, lostinamerica

      and I am still a tad confused, perhaps I should amend that to say dismayed at what sounds to me like doublespeak. They  cannot inspect it but they can examine it. wtf?

      David Miranda has been granted a limited injunction at the high court to stop the government and police "inspecting, copying or sharing" data seized from him during his detention at Heathrow airport – but examination by the police for national security purposes is allowed.

      Miranda had taken the government to court to try and get the data returned, but judges ruled that the police would be able to make limited use of what had been taken during his nine-hour detention on Sunday. He is the partner of Glenn Greenwald, the Guardian reporter who has exposed mass digital surveillance by US and UK spy agencies.

      The court ruled the authorities must not inspect the data nor distribute it domestically or to any foreign government or agency unless it is for the purpose of ensuring the protection national security or for investigating whether Miranda is himself involved in the commission, instigation or preparation of an act of terrorism.

      But the ruling also meant that data cannot be used for the purposes of criminal investigation – although the court had previously heard that the Met had launched a criminal investigation after analysing the seized data.
      Robert Booth, The Guardian

      If I can't dance I don't want to be part of your revolution. ~ Emma Goldman

      by Lady Libertine on Thu Aug 22, 2013 at 07:11:04 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  a paragraph you included - criminal charges? (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Lady Libertine, OLinda
        But the ruling also meant that data cannot be used for the purposes of criminal investigation – although the court had previously heard that the Met had launched a criminal investigation after analysing the seized data.
        are they going to be charged with criminal theft?

        will have to wait until this is clarified over the next few days

        we do know that they threatened Miranda with jail unless he turned over his passwords

        and they were not kidding around

        and he knows that once in jail, well, look at others in jail ...

        he didn't want to go there

        and he could not even have his attorney present

        police state tactics???

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