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  •  I'm reading Neil Gaiman's American Gods (8+ / 0-)

    I love the book, wish I weren't nearly done with it. And I love the America in the book, part true life detail and part mythology, and somehow in clearer focus for having been written by a (now former) Brit.

    In the intro, he describes going on the road to see the sights and get a feel for his new land. In 2004-05, I drove alone across country three times, and American Gods keeps bringing bits of those excursions back to me. I love the book's theory that random roadside attractions are really power points, places that because of the gods or whatever, people need an excuse to visit. So the excuse becomes World's Ugliest Lizard or Biggest Ball of String and such. I stopped at many odd spots I couldn't really explain loving (e.g. the Spam museum), so I was very taken with this bit of in-book mythology.

    "I am sure of very little, and I shouldn't be surprised if those things were wrong." Clarence Darrow

    by scilicet on Wed Aug 21, 2013 at 09:08:57 PM PDT

    •  That sounds cool (4+ / 0-)

      Hubby and I would often pull over and read the roadside signs that explained how something had happened at this place.  

      We found tiny museums here and there that were wonderful.

      There are some wonderful places in the US, for sure.

      I wouldn't be surprised if Wall Drug was a power point.  :)

      Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

      by cfk on Wed Aug 21, 2013 at 09:13:05 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  i just finished american gods... (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      scilicet, cfk, Brecht, RiveroftheWest

      it was my first gaiman and i read it on a recommendation made here!

      i liked it.  thought the end was a little too pat.

      the roadside attraction device was clever and evocative for anyone who's ever road-tripped...

      my biggest complaint was that the characters seemed to lack depth.

      Deserves it! I daresay he does. Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement. For even the very wise cannot see all ends. - Gandalf the Grey

      by No Exit on Thu Aug 22, 2013 at 08:26:08 AM PDT

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      •  my favorite roadside attraction... (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        scilicet, cfk, RiveroftheWest

        was a snake farm located between austin and san antonio.  

        it was run by a vietnam vet who had a doublewide mobile home full top to bottom of dangerous and non-dangerous snakes.

        i recall the death adder and enormous boa constrictor in a cage.

        at the end of the exhibits was a wishing well with a mess of rattlers on the bottom that would shake their rattles if you hit them in the head with one of the quarters you were encouraged to drop.  i still regret not buying any of the various snake skin items he had for sale in the "gift shop."

        Deserves it! I daresay he does. Many that live deserve death. And some that die deserve life. Can you give it to them? Then do not be too eager to deal out death in judgement. For even the very wise cannot see all ends. - Gandalf the Grey

        by No Exit on Thu Aug 22, 2013 at 08:29:02 AM PDT

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      •  I agree but was okay with it because so many (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cfk, No Exit, Brecht, RiveroftheWest

        characters were gods and thus types. And I liked the charm of the main character's passivity or docility, however you'd describe his "do your own time, not someone else's" approach. I listened to the 10th anniversary audiobook, a full-cast production (different readers for different voices), and I loved the person who narrated when it was in Shadow's voice--he really captured that blend of sweetness and defeatism. If I love a main character, I find I'm less hard on minor characters.

        And now, sigh, I've finished the book. Whatever I listen to on my walk this morning is going to suffer by comparison, I just know it. I have Cline's Ready Player One, which got great reviews. Maybe I'll try that one first.

        "I am sure of very little, and I shouldn't be surprised if those things were wrong." Clarence Darrow

        by scilicet on Thu Aug 22, 2013 at 10:04:41 AM PDT

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        •  'Ready Player One' - Best 21st Century SF Book? (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cfk, scilicet, P Carey, RiveroftheWest

          It's sitting at the top of a goodreads list, with 312 votes.

          Also, a good friend loved it. High on my TBR list.

          "Every man has a right to utter what he thinks truth" Samuel Johnson

          by Brecht on Thu Aug 22, 2013 at 11:31:39 AM PDT

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          •  It has the most captivating opening! (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Brecht, cfk, P Carey, RiveroftheWest

            I am so jealous of it -- any agent or editor who read the first few pages would certainly buy it on the spot. And lucky for me, I'm still 100% interested after maybe 2 hours of the audiobook. Best of all, I immediately forgot that I was lovesick for American Gods. Too often if I love a book, I don't finish the next three or four because they don't seem to measure up. Not true with this one, at least not so far. And it doesn't hurt that the narrator is Wil Wheaton. He's been among my favorites since I came across the perfect marriage--Wheaton reading John Scalzi's Redshirts. Anyway, so far, big thumbs up for Ready Player One.

            "I am sure of very little, and I shouldn't be surprised if those things were wrong." Clarence Darrow

            by scilicet on Thu Aug 22, 2013 at 01:12:22 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

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