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View Diary: Evil: DEA Bans Armored Cars From Picking up Pot Shop Cash (180 comments)

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  •  Yes. (9+ / 0-)
    But, you know, I think it is a good way to get out the vote in 2014. Get medical or flat out legalize pot bills on the ballot and you can motivate voters to turn out.

    "My country, right or wrong; if right, to be kept right; and if wrong, to be set right." -- Sen Carl Schurz 1872

    by Calamity Jean on Tue Aug 27, 2013 at 04:11:03 AM PDT

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    •  That and living wage bills n/t (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      se portland, Stwriley, tb mare, JeffW, Dave925
    •  The problem will be... (0+ / 0-)

      in the large number of states like mine (Pennsylvania) where there are no provisions for changing the law through citizen propositions or referendums. Here, we must wait on the legislature and governor, who will always lag behind. Even taking into account the ballot box, this is a much longer and slower process for us. Unlike other issues that can be fought and won in court as well as legislatively (like marriage equality), there's no good legal/court route for challenging pot prohibition. So we're stuck in the current system until there's such widespread outcry that the legislature and governor are both progressive enough to agree and feel sufficient political pressure to act. Until then, I'm afraid we'll be a drag on the rest of the states with more democratically-oriented institutional structures.

      Strategy without tactics is the slowest route to victory, tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat. Sun Tzu The Art of War

      by Stwriley on Tue Aug 27, 2013 at 06:47:41 AM PDT

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      •  Can you at least get *advisory* referendums (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Stwriley, JeffW

        on the ballot without the governor's or legislature's approval?  Even that might pull in more voters.  

        So we're stuck in the current system until there's such widespread outcry that the legislature and governor are both progressive enough to agree and feel sufficient political pressure to act. Until then, I'm afraid we'll be a drag on the rest of the states with more democratically-oriented institutional structures.
        Sadly, you're probably right.  My own state, Illinois, just in the last few months approved medical marijuana and still doesn't have marriage equality.  

        "My country, right or wrong; if right, to be kept right; and if wrong, to be set right." -- Sen Carl Schurz 1872

        by Calamity Jean on Tue Aug 27, 2013 at 08:40:24 AM PDT

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      •  Well, you could concentrate on Congressional (1+ / 0-)
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        Stwriley

        candidates--changing the federal law is going to be a tough nut to crack, but it's ultimately the key...until federal law changes, all state laws legalizing pot remain in a state of legal limbo, dependent on the whim of the present administration to decide whether to prosecute or not. Legally, possession or sale of marijuana is still a (federal) felony in all states.

        "All governments lie, but disaster lies in wait for countries whose officials smoke the same hashish they give out." --I.F. Stone

        by Alice in Florida on Tue Aug 27, 2013 at 10:33:48 AM PDT

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        •  Even that's a tough one for me... (0+ / 0-)

          but that's more about the dynamics of my district than anything larger. I live in PA-02 in Philly, which is as solidly Democratic a district as you're likely to find (it's PVI is D+39 for goodness sake!) But we have a long-serving congressperson who is basically a do-little: Chaka Fatah. He's sponsered a couple of decent higher education bills in his time, but after 18 years in Congress you expect a bit more than that. He has one of the safest districts in the country and could use it for serious activism on the Hill, but he doesn't. He's also no friend of legalization.

          Yet the chances of turning him out for another Democrat are virtually nil. He has the backing of the city's Democratic machine, with all the cash that implies, and nothing that could hurt his reputation enough to give a challenger an opening. Basically, he's too milquetoast to attack successfully. Running against him from any other party (even from the left) is a doomed effort in this city. In 2012 the Republicans didn't even bother to field a candidate, and in 2010 the one they did find raised only $10,000 (as a party-backed Republican congressional candidate!) Chaka, meanwhile, has a warchest that is the envy of many another congressperson. Our best bet of getting someone better is that he'll be offered an administration job somewhere and step down.

          Like I said, it's a local issue on that point, but it's still pretty bleak from where I'm sitting.

          Strategy without tactics is the slowest route to victory, tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat. Sun Tzu The Art of War

          by Stwriley on Tue Aug 27, 2013 at 01:50:48 PM PDT

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