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View Diary: Why is nobody talking about the OTHER Obamacare subsidy? (178 comments)

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  •  NO. Gross is all the income that comes (0+ / 0-)

    to a person. If he is an independent contractor he should be filing a form C for a business and subtracting legitimate expenses for the income. Then you carry that net amount over to the 1040. You add inother sources of income on the 1040 side 1 and that total the adjusted gross income. That is the last line on the page 1.

    And it carries over to the top of page two. There you subtract the standard deduction (or you itemized deductions) and your personal exemptions.  That gives you your taxable income — which is irrelevant for the ACA.

    It is your adjustable gross income that is what you would report.

    I'm asking you to believe. Not in my ability to bring about real change in Washington ... *I'm asking you to believe in yours.* Barack Obama

    by samddobermann on Sat Nov 23, 2013 at 06:27:14 AM PST

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    •  Actually it's modified AGI (0+ / 0-)

      one thing they do is include in benefits such as Social Security (my husband gets SSDI in addition to private disability insurance payments, so only part of the SSDI is included in AGI  but all of it is included in Modified AGI...there are some other differences like that I don't recall.

      This is one of the things that ticks me off...my husband, thank goodness, has Medicare. But on our combined income we make (a couple thousand) too much for a subsidy, so we're expected to pay upwards of 9% of our income to insure just me...and for a crappy high deductible plan at that. I'd gladly pay full freight (around $560/month) for Medicare--which would run the same cost as a "Silver" plan but with better than "Gold" benefits. But thanks to Lieberman et al, that's not an option.

      "All governments lie, but disaster lies in wait for countries whose officials smoke the same hashish they give out." --I.F. Stone

      by Alice in Florida on Sat Nov 23, 2013 at 05:27:39 PM PST

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      •  Medicare jas a 20% deductible and (0+ / 0-)

        sharp limits on a lot of things — although it has been improved immensely by the ACA.

        The deductible for hospitalization is over $1000 but the rules make a lot of hospitalizations "not count" as such. It is separate from the regular Medicare deductible of about $130.

        But then you have to buy a separate private prescription plan.

        Have you actually looked at the exchange?

        I'm asking you to believe. Not in my ability to bring about real change in Washington ... *I'm asking you to believe in yours.* Barack Obama

        by samddobermann on Mon Nov 25, 2013 at 12:36:15 AM PST

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        •  Yes. That's how I know (0+ / 0-)

          I'm not eligible for a subsidy, and the only plan that's less than $500 a month has a $6,350 deductible. There are plans for $5,000 deductible that cost over $500 a month, and of course once the deductible is met there's a 40% or 30% copay. for a deductible as low as $2,000, the premium starts hitting $800 a month or more--and this is for one person. Many plans don't include our doctor, many are HMOs with very limited networks and no payments for anything outside those networks. Of course, I do realize that it could be worse--given that insurers wanted a bigger multiplier for age, I suppose I should count myself lucky that the plan with the $6,350 deductible isn't $800 a month.

          One thing I did get through signing up on healthcare.gov--a letter telling me I may be eligible for Medicaid, but since my state doesn't offer it, I'm exempt from the health insurance mandate. Obviously wrong, though who's to say I don't believe I'm exempt? It says so, on an official letter.

          At any rate, I have at least until March to sign up, and will probably wait. I'm not one of those young healthy individuals they want to sign up--but I'm not in need of healthcare services, so I'm not in a hurry.

          "All governments lie, but disaster lies in wait for countries whose officials smoke the same hashish they give out." --I.F. Stone

          by Alice in Florida on Mon Nov 25, 2013 at 08:00:45 PM PST

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        •  And I am aware of the (0+ / 0-)

          co-pays for Medicare, keeping in mind that Medicare limits what doctors and hospitals can charge, it's not that bad. $1,000 deductible for a hospital admission is not bad, especially if you don't need to go to the hospital very often. Actually, what's great about Medicare is that it's not limited to one state, and if I could get Medicare I could be assured of having access to care when I'm up north and wouldn't have to worry about having a medical emergency and not being covered because I'm away from the network.

          "All governments lie, but disaster lies in wait for countries whose officials smoke the same hashish they give out." --I.F. Stone

          by Alice in Florida on Mon Nov 25, 2013 at 08:10:41 PM PST

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