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View Diary: Traffic Cameras: Don't watch me, bro! (97 comments)

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  •  Have to disagree. (7+ / 0-)

    I pass a speed enforcement camera every day on my commute.  There are two kinds of cars that pass that camera.  One, cars who don't know it's there and speed on unaffected.  These people get tickets later, but the camera has no effect on their speed at the time and do nothing to enhance the safety of the adjacent school.

    The other cars are those who know it's there and slow down in the enforcement spot, then speed up again as soon as they're past.  For these cars, there is minimal effect on school safety, but they don't get a ticket.

    In short, this camera does nothing to enhance pedestrian safety, but it does generate revenue.

    You can't spell CRAZY without R-AZ.

    by rb608 on Fri Nov 22, 2013 at 02:38:33 PM PST

    [ Parent ]

    •  Accident rates increase with cameras (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      rb608

      http://www.caranddriver.com/...

      It's a 2 page article, worth reading in full, so you can understand how the "safety" data are being manipulated, but here are a few choice quotes:

      In Charlotte, North Carolina, station WBTV had this to say, "Three years, 125,000 tickets, and $6 million in fines later, the number of accidents at intersections in Charlotte has gone down less than one percent. And the number of rear-end accidents, which are much more common, has gone up 15 percent."

      In Greensboro, the News & Record reports, "There has not been a drop in the number of accidents caused by red-light violations citywide since the first cameras were installed in February 2001. There were 95 such accidents in Greensboro in 2001, the same number as in 2000. And at the 18 intersections with cameras, the number of wrecks caused by red-light running has doubled."

      The granddaddy of all studies, covering a 10-year period, was done for the Australian Road Research Board in 1995 (cameras went up in Melbourne in 1984). Photo enforcement "did not provide any reduction in accidents, rather there has been increases in rear end and [cross-street] accidents," wrote author David Andreassen in the page-one summary.

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